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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Analysis of Engine Vibration and Noise Induced by a Valve Train Element Combined With the Dynamic Behaviors

[+] Author and Article Information
Jie Guo

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: guojie@hrbeu.edu.cn

Yipeng Cao

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: yipengcao@hrbeu.edu.cn

Wenping Zhang

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: zhangwenping@hrbeu.edu.cn

Xinyu Zhang

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: zhangxinyu@hrbeu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received January 28, 2016; final manuscript received January 29, 2016; published online March 30, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(9), 092806 (Mar 30, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1044; doi: 10.1115/1.4032715 History: Received January 28, 2016; Revised January 29, 2016

The engine vibration and noise induced by a valve train element are analyzed through the modeling and experiment method. The valve train dynamics are first studied to make clear the sources of the valve train noise. The component flexibility and inertia of mass are all taken into consideration as well as the contact or impact behaviors. The contact or impact forces are applied on the combined model of a combined structure. The resulting vibration responses at the outer surfaces are considered to be the boundary conditions of the acoustic model. The acoustic model is built by the boundary element method. The analysis results show that the noise induced by the valve train element is mainly in the 500–800 Hz 1/3 octave bands. The noise in this frequency range is related to not only the resonance of oil pan and valve cover but also the overall combined structure stiffness. And moreover, the resonance of the valve train element excited by the harmonic of the camshaft rotational frequency has heightened the noise radiation in this frequency range. The noise in the low-frequency range is determined by the exciting components of the cam profile, and that in the high-frequency range are produced mainly by the valve–seat impact and by the cam–tappet impact. The analysis results are proved well by comparison with the experimental results. Thus, the results are very useful for understanding the source characteristics of valve train noise.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The analysis process

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Fig. 2

Dynamic model of a valve train element

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Fig. 3

Contact configuration between cam and tappet

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Fig. 4

Combined model of the combined structure

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Fig. 5

Load distribution on rocker arm shaft

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Fig. 6

Boundary element model

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Fig. 7

Arrangement of the test rig

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Fig. 10

Positions of the microphones

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Fig. 8

Measurement of the valve acceleration

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Fig. 9

Positions of the accelerometers

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Fig. 11

Valve acceleration in time domain

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Fig. 12

Dynamic analysis in frequency domain

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Fig. 13

Exciting component analysis of the contact forces (900 rpm)

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Fig. 14

Vibration responses at point #1 (900 rpm)

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Fig. 15

Vibration responses at point #2 (900 rpm)

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Fig. 16

Vibration responses at point #3 (700 rpm)

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Fig. 17

Comparison of exciting force contributions

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Fig. 18

Sound pressure at observing point #3 (900 rpm)

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Fig. 19

Transient sound pressure (45 deg, 700 rpm)

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Fig. 20

Transient sound pressure (175 deg, 700 rpm)

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Fig. 21

Sound pressure at observing point #7 (700 rpm)

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Fig. 22

Sound pressure at observing point #6 (1100 rpm)

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Fig. 23

The 1/3 octave band sound pressure level (900 rpm)

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Fig. 24

Valve lash sensitivity to valve noise (900 rpm)

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