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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Use of Adaptive Injection Strategies to Increase the Full Load Limit of RCCI Operation

[+] Author and Article Information
Reed Hanson, Andrew Ickes

Argonne National Laboratory,
Lemont, IL 60439

Thomas Wallner

Argonne National Laboratory
Lemont, IL 60439

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received January 26, 2016; final manuscript received January 27, 2016; published online April 12, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(10), 102802 (Apr 12, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1034; doi: 10.1115/1.4032847 History: Received January 26, 2016; Revised January 27, 2016

Dual-fuel combustion using port-injection of low reactivity fuel combined with direct injection (DI) of a higher reactivity fuel, otherwise known as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), has been shown as a method to achieve low-temperature combustion with moderate peak pressure rise rates, low engine-out soot and NOx emissions, and high indicated thermal efficiency. A key requirement for extending to high-load operation is moderating the reactivity of the premixed charge prior to the diesel injection. One way to accomplish this is to use a very low reactivity fuel such as natural gas. In this work, experimental testing was conducted on a 13 l multicylinder heavy-duty diesel engine modified to operate using RCCI combustion with port injection of natural gas and DI of diesel fuel. Engine testing was conducted at an engine speed of 1200 rpm over a wide variety of loads and injection conditions. The impact on dual-fuel engine performance and emissions with respect to varying the fuel injection parameters is quantified within this study. The injection strategies used in the work were found to affect the combustion process in similar ways to both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI combustion for phasing control and emissions performance. As the load is increased, the port fuel injection (PFI) quantity was reduced to keep peak cylinder pressure (PCP) and maximum pressure rise rate (MPRR) under the imposed limits. Overall, the peak load using the new injection strategy was shown to reach 22 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with a peak brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of 47.6%.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of test engine configuration

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Fig. 2

Representative injection strategy with PFI injection during intake stroke and the dual direct diesel injections

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Fig. 3

Baseline operating condition cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 4

PFI mass fraction sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 5

Emissions performance for the PFI mass fraction sweep

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Fig. 6

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the PFI mass fraction sweep

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Fig. 7

Emissions performance for the pilot SOI timing sweep

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Fig. 8

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the pilot SOI timing sweep

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Fig. 9

Pilot SOI timing sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 10

Main SOI timing sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 11

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the main SOI timing sweep

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Fig. 12

Emissions performance for the main SOI timing sweep

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Fig. 13

Pilot mass fraction sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR. Values denote the mass fraction of the DI fuel in the main injection.

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Fig. 14

Emissions performance for the pilot fraction sweep

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Fig. 15

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the pilot fraction sweep

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Fig. 16

EGR sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 17

Emissions performance for the EGR sweep

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Fig. 18

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the EGR sweep

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Fig. 19

Rail pressure sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 20

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the rail pressure sweep

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Fig. 21

Emissions performance for the rail pressure sweep

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Fig. 22

Load sweep cylinder pressure and AHRR

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Fig. 23

Thermal efficiency and combustion performance for the load sweep

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Fig. 24

Combustion performance for the load sweep

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Fig. 25

Efficiency performance for the load sweep

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Fig. 26

Combustion efficiency, heat transfer, and exhaust losses for the load sweep

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