0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Numerical Analysis of Bladed Disk–Casing Contact With Friction and Wear

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Almeida

SAFRAN Turbomeca,
Avenue Joseph Szydlowski,
Bordes Cedex 64511, France
e-mail: patricio.almeida@turbomeca.fr

C. Gibert, F. Thouverez, X. Leblanc

École Centrale de Lyon,
Laboratoire de Tribologie et
Dynamique des Systèmes,
36 Avenue Guy de Collongue,
Ecully Cedex 69134, France

J.-P. Ousty

SAFRAN Turbomeca,
Avenue Joseph Szydlowski,
Bordes Cedex 64511, France

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 5, 2016; final manuscript received February 23, 2016; published online July 19, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(12), 122802 (Jul 19, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1056; doi: 10.1115/1.4033065 History: Received February 05, 2016; Revised February 23, 2016

In order to increase the aerodynamic performances of their engines, aircraft engine manufacturers try to minimize the clearance between rotating and stationary parts in axial and centrifugal compressors. Consequently, the probability of contact increases, leading to undesirable phenomena caused by forced excitation of the natural modes or by modal interaction. Due to the complexity of these phenomena, many numerical studies have been conducted to gain a better understanding of the physics associated with them, looking primarily at their respective influence on potential unstable behaviors. However, the influence of other physical phenomena, such as friction and wear, remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to show some effects associated with friction and wear on the dynamic behavior resulting from blade-to-casing interaction. The numerical study reported here is based on a simplified finite element model of a rotating bladed disk and a flexible casing. The contact algorithm uses an explicit time marching scheme with the Lagrange multipliers method. Friction and wear are formulated using, respectively, Coulomb's and Archard's laws. The rotational speed is set to critical speed giving rise to modal interaction between a backward mode of the casing and a counter-rotating mode of the bladed disk with one nodal diameter (ND). Contact is initiated by a dynamic excitation of the stator. In the presence of friction, the system becomes unstable when a sideband of the excitation frequency coincides with 1ND mode of the bladed disk. The introduction of wear leads to a vibration reduction, while the abradable material is removed by the wear process. The number of wear lobes produced on the casing is related to the ratio between the vibration frequency of the blades and the rotating speed. The ratio obtained by means of the FE model corroborates experimental observations.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Jacquet-Richardet, G. , Torkhani, M. , Cartraud, P. , Thouverez, F. , Baranger, T. N. , Herran, M. , Gibert, C. , Baguet, S. , Almeida, P. , and Peletan, L. , 2013, “ Rotor to Stator Contacts in Turbomachines. Review and Application,” Mech. Syst. Signal Process., 40(2), pp. 401–420. [CrossRef]
Almeida, P. , Gibert, C. , Thouverez, F. , Leblanc, X. , and Ousty, J.-P. , 2014, “ Experimental Analysis of Dynamic Interaction Between a Centrifugal Compressor and Its Casing,” ASME J. Turbomach., 137(3), p. 031008. [CrossRef]
Millecamps, A. , Brunel, J.-F. , Dufrenoy, P. , Garcin, F. , and Nucci, M. , 2009, “ Influence of Thermal Effects During Blade-Casing Contact Experiments,” ASME Paper No. DETC2009-86842.
Batailly, A. , Legrand, M. , Millecamps, A. , and Garcin, F. , 2012, “ Numerical-Experimental Comparison in the Simulation of Rotor/Stator Interaction Through Blade-Tip/Abradable Coating Contact,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 134(8), p. 082504. [CrossRef]
Strömberg, N. , 1999, “ Finite Element Treatment of Two-Dimensional Thermoelastic Wear Problems,” Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 177(3–4), pp. 441–455. [CrossRef]
Salles, L. , Blanc, L. , Thouverez, F. , Gouskov, A. , and Jean, P. , 2012, “ Dual Time Stepping Algorithms With the High Order Harmonic Balance Method for Contact Interfaces With Fretting-Wear,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 134(3), p. 032503.
Archard, J. F. , 1953, “ Contact and Rubbing of Flat Surfaces,” J. Appl. Phys., 24(8), pp. 981–988. [CrossRef]
Williams, R. , 2011, “ Simulation of Blade Casing Interaction Phenomena in Gas Turbines Resulting From Heavy Tip Rubs Using an Implicit Time Marching Method,” ASME Paper No. GT2011-45495.
Almeida, P. , Gibert, C. , Thouverez, F. , and Ousty, J.-P. , 2014, “ On Some Physical Phenomena Involved in Blade-Casing Contact,” 9th International Conference on Structural Dynamics, Porto, Portugal, June 30–July 2, pp. 2063–2071.
Lesaffre, N. , Sinou, J.-J. , and Thouverez, F. , 2007, “ Contact Analysis of a Flexible Bladed-Rotor,” Eur. J. Mech.-A/Solids, 26(3), pp. 541–557. [CrossRef]
Love, A. E. H. , 1906, A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity, Cambridge University Press, New York.
Lesaffre, N. , 2007, “ Stabilité et analyse non-linéaire du contact rotor-stator,” Ph.D. thesis, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Lyon, France.
Carpenter, N. J. , Taylor, R. L. , and Katona, M. G. , 1991, “ Lagrange Constraints for Transient Finite Element Surface Contact,” Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng., 32(1), pp. 103–128. [CrossRef]
Legrand, M. , 2005, “ Modèles de prédiction de l'interaction rotor/stator dans un moteur d'avion,” Ph.D. thesis, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Nantes, France.
Legrand, M. , Pierre, C. , Cartraud, P. , and Lombard, J.-P. , 2009, “ Two-Dimensional Modeling of an Aircraft Engine Structural Bladed Disk-Casing Modal Interaction,” J. Sound Vib., 319(1–2), pp. 366–391. [CrossRef]
Salles, L. , 2010, “ Etude de l'usure par fretting sous chargements dynamiques dans les interfaces frottantes: Application aux pieds d'aubes de turbomachines,” Ph.D. thesis, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Lyon, France.
Salles, L. , Blanc, L. , Thouverez, F. , Gouskov, A. , and Jean, P. , 2009, “ Dynamic Analysis of a Bladed Disk With Friction and Fretting-Wear in Blade Attachments,” ASME Paper No. GT2009-60151.
Salles, L. , Blanc, L. , Thouverez, F. , and Gouskov, A. , 2011, “ Dynamic Analysis of Fretting-Wear in Friction Contact Interfaces,” Int. J. Solids Struct., 48(10), pp. 1513–1524. [CrossRef]
Schmiechen, P. , 1997, “ Travelling Wave Speed Coincidence,” Ph.D. thesis, Imperial College of London, London, UK.
Al-Badour, F. , Sunar, M. , and Cheded, L. , 2011, “ Vibration Analysis of Rotating Machinery Using Time-Frequency Analysis and Wavelet Techniques,” Mech. Syst. Signal Process., 25(6), pp. 2083–2101. [CrossRef]
Shmaliy, Y. , 2006, Continuous-Time Signals, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.
Millecamps, A. , 2010, “ Interaction aube-carter: Contribution de l'usure de l'abradable et de la thermomécanique sur la dynamique d'aube,” Ph.D. thesis, Université de Lille 1, Lille, France.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of two sectors of the bladed disk with the elastic ring (casing)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Campbell diagram in stationary frame. Modal coincidence corresponds to the relation −ωsnd=−ωrnd+nd Ωc.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Dynamic response of the casing (top) and the bladed disk (bottom) for μ = 0.1 and kw = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

STFT of the radial displacement of the casing and the tangential displacement of a blade tip for μ = 0.1 and kw = 0: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Two-dimensional DFT diagram of the first family of modes of both structures at t < 2.78 s for μ = 0.1 and kw = 0: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Two-dimensional DFT diagram of the first family of modes of both structures at t > 2.78 s for μ = 0.1 and kw = 0: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Extraction of 1ND from STFT: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Extraction of 2ND from STFT: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Dynamic response of the casing (top) and the bladed disk (bottom) with a fast speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

STFT of the radial displacement of the casing and the tangential displacement of a blade tip with a fast speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw = 1 × 10−12 Pa−1: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Two-dimensional DFT diagram of the first family of modes of both structures during the burst. Simulation computed with a fast speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Wear pattern analysis of the abradable coating for a simulation with a fast speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1: (a) time history of wear patterns and (b) wear map at the beginning of the burst

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Dynamic response of the bladed disk (top) and the casing (bottom) with a slow speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

STFT of the radial displacement of the casing and the tangential displacement of a blade tip with a slow speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1: (a) casing and (b) bladed disk

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Time history of wear patterns of the abradable coating for a simulation with a slow speed ramp for μ = 0.1 and kw=1×10−12 Pa−1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In