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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Investigation on Flowfield Characteristics and Performance of Shock Vector Control Nozzle Based on Confined Transverse Injection

[+] Author and Article Information
Shi Jingwei

Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: shijingwei@mail.nwpu.edu.cn

Zhou Li

Professor
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: zhouli@nwpu.edu.cn

Wang Zhanxue

Professor
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: wangzx@nwpu.edu.cn

Sun Xiaolin

Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: 2014100446@mail.nwpu.edu.cn

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received August 13, 2015; final manuscript received February 22, 2016; published online April 26, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Eric Petersen.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(10), 101502 (Apr 26, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1408; doi: 10.1115/1.4033140 History: Received August 13, 2015; Revised February 22, 2016

Shock vector controlling (SVC) nozzle, based on confined transverse injection and shock wave/boundary layer interaction, offers an alternative for future aircraft thrust vectoring (TV) exhausting system, due to its simple structure, low weight, and quick vector response. In the paper, the flow mechanism of SVC nozzle was studied by numerical simulation after the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models was confirmed. Then, the influence of substantial affecting factors, including injection configurations and injection angles, on the confined transverse injection flowfield characteristics and vector performance was investigated numerically. The results show that the “λ” shock wave induced by the jet injection causes unbalanced side force for the primary flow deflecting, and under larger secondary pressure ratio (SPR), the induced shock wave interacts with upper wall, weakening the thrust vector efficiency; with the increase of injection orifice numbers, the vector angle of SVC nozzle rises and is less than that of slot injection configuration; under smaller SPR, the thrust vector angle increases with the injection angle. For the case of SPR = 1.0 and 1.2, there exist optimal injection angles at which the maximum TV angle achieved.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch map of a shock vector control nozzle

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Fig. 2

The turbulence model validation by comparing with experimental data

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Fig. 3

The geometric model of an SVC nozzle with secondary injection slot (unit: mm)

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Fig. 4

Geometric models of an SVC nozzle with secondary injection orifices (unit: mm): (a) 7 secondary injection orifices, (b) 13 secondary injection orifices, and (c) 19 secondary injection orifices

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Fig. 5

Computational grids and boundary conditions

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Fig. 6

Separation length of the boundary layer upstream of injection slot

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Fig. 7

Typical flowfield of an SVC nozzle with of slot injection: (a) SPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.6 and (b) SPR = 13.88 and NPR = 1.5

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Fig. 8

Pressure distributions on nozzle walls (NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.5)

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Fig. 9

Limited streamlines distributions of an SVC nozzle with slot injection: (a) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.6 and (b) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.5

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Fig. 10

The shock wave unsteady characteristics of an SVC nozzle: (a) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.6 and (b) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.5

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Fig. 11

Streamlines around secondary injection ports

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Fig. 12

Streamlines for high and low Ma zone on exit plane of nozzle

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Fig. 13

Ma distributions in different Z planes at different SPRs: (a) NPR = 13.88, SPR = 1.2, and Z = −0.003785 m and (b) NPR = 13.88, SPR = 1.2, and Z = −0.00759 m

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Fig. 14

Ma distributions on exit plane of an SVC nozzle at different SPRs: (a) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.6 and (b) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.2

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Fig. 15

Pressure distributions on the lower wall of an SVC nozzle: (a) 7-orifice configuration, (b) 13-orifice configuration, and (c) slot injection configuration

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Fig. 16

Vector performance of an SVC nozzle with different injection configurations (NPR = 13.88): (a) thrust coefficient Cfg and (b) vector angle δp

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Fig. 22

Thrust coefficient of an SVC nozzle with different injection angles

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Fig. 21

Vector angle of an SVC nozzle with different injection angles

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Fig. 20

Pressure distributions on the lower and upper walls of an SVC nozzle: (a) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.0 and (b) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.6

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Fig. 19

Ma distributions of an SVC nozzle with different injection angles (NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.0): (a) θ = 100 deg, (b) θ = 110 deg, (c) θ = 120 deg, and (d) θ = 130 deg

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Fig. 18

Pressure distributions on the lower wall of an SVC nozzle: (a) 7-orifice configuration and (b) 19-orifice configuration

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Fig. 17

Ma distributions of an SVC nozzle with different injection orifices (dashed-dotted line: 7 injection orifices, solid line: 13 injection orifices, and dashed line: 19 injection orifices): (a) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 0.8 and (b) NPR = 13.88 and SPR = 1.5

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