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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Guide Vane Length to Improve the Performance of a Diesel Engine Run With Biodiesel

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Bari

Barbara Hardy Institute,
School of Engineering,
University of South Australia,
Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia
e-mail: saiful.bari@unisa.edu.au

Idris Saad

Automotive Research and Testing Center (ARTeC),
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
Universiti Teknologi MARA,
Shah Alam 40450, Selangor, Malaysia
e-mail: idris.saad@mymail.unisa.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 13, 2015; final manuscript received March 24, 2016; published online May 24, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Stani Bohac.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(11), 112804 (May 24, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1278; doi: 10.1115/1.4033509 History: Received July 13, 2015; Revised March 24, 2016

This research investigated the effect of guide vanes into the intake runner of a diesel engine run with higher viscous biodiesel to enhance the in-cylinder intake airflow characteristics. First, simulation of an internal combustion engine base model was done. Guide vanes of various lengths were developed and imposed into the intake runner to investigate the airflow characteristics. Based on the simulation results, five guide vanes models of 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 mm length were constructed and tested on a compression ignition (CI) engine run with biodiesel. According to the experimental results of engine performance and emissions, it was found that guide vanes of 12 mm length showed the highest number of improvements with 14 mm and 10 mm length showed the second and third highest number of improvements, respectively. Therefore, this research concluded that guide vanes successfully improved the in-cylinder air flow characteristics to improve the mixing of higher viscous biodiesel with air resulting in better performances of the engines than without vanes.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Guide vane and its assembly on the base model

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Fig. 3

Average in-cylinder TKE

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Fig. 4

Maximum in-cylinder TKE

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Fig. 5

Average in-cylinder velocity

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Fig. 6

Maximum in-cylinder velocity

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Fig. 7

Average in-cylinder vorticity

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Fig. 8

Maximum in-cylinder vorticity

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Fig. 9

Average in-cylinder swirling strength

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Fig. 10

Maximum in-cylinder swirling strength

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Fig. 11

Photograph of the guide vanes

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Fig. 12

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup

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Fig. 13

Engine load variations of BSFC for all runs

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Fig. 14

Engine load variations of engine efficiency for all runs

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Fig. 15

Engine load variations of engine torque for all runs

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Fig. 16

Engine load variations of exhaust temperature for all runs

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Fig. 17

Engine load variations of CO2 for all runs

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Fig. 18

Engine load variations of NOx for all runs

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Fig. 19

Engine load variations of CO for all runs

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Fig. 20

Engine load variations of HC for all runs

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