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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

A Constant-Pressure Model for the Overlap of Chambers in Rotary Internal Combustion Engines

[+] Author and Article Information
Ezequiel J. López

Professor
Departamento de Mecánica Aplicada,
Facultad de Ingeniería,
U. N. del Comahue, CONICET,
Buenos Aires 1400,
Neuquén Q8300IBX, Argentina
e-mail: ezequiel.lopez@fain.uncoma.edu.ar

Carlos A. Wild Cañón

Departamento de Mecánica Aplicada,
Facultad de Ingeniería,
U. N. del Comahue,
Buenos Aires 1400,
Neuquén Q8300IBX, Argentina
e-mail: chiquito_wc@hotmail.com

Sofía S. Sarraf

Professor
Departamento de Mecánica Aplicada,
Facultad de Ingeniería,
U. N. del Comahue, CONICET,
Buenos Aires 1400,
Neuquén Q8300IBX, Argentina
e-mail: sofia.sarraf@fain.uncoma.edu.ar

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 9, 2013; final manuscript received May 27, 2016; published online June 28, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(11), 112808 (Jun 28, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1447; doi: 10.1115/1.4033744 History: Received December 09, 2013; Revised May 27, 2016

In this work, a constant-pressure model capable to simulate the overlap of chambers in rotary internal combustion engines is proposed. It refers as a chamber overlap when two adjacent chambers are in communication through the same port, which could occur in some rotary internal combustion engines. The proposed model is thermodynamic (or zero-dimensional (0D)) in nature and is designed for application in engine simulators that combine one-dimensional (1D) gasdynamic models with thermodynamic ones. Since the equations of the proposed model depend on the flow direction and on the flow regime, a robust and reliable solution strategy is developed. The model is assessed using a two-dimensional (2D) problem and is applied in the simulation of a rotary internal combustion engine. Results for this last problem are compared with other common approaches used in the simulation of rotary engines, showing the importance of effects such as the interaction between overlapping chambers and the dynamics of the flow.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Outline of a Wankel engine during the chamber overlap in the exhaust port

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Fig. 2

Outline of an MRCVC engine during the chamber overlap in the intake and exhaust ports

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Fig. 3

Sketch of two chambers in connection with a pipe. Definitions of the points considered in the proposed model and orientation of normals.

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the mass flux per unit length through throats 1 and 2, and the right pipe end computed with the 0D/1D model and the 2D model for the problem of the discharge of two tanks to the atmosphere

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the density into the tanks computed with the 0D/1D model and the 2D model for the problem of the discharge of two tanks to the atmosphere

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the pressure into the tanks computed with the 0D/1D model and the 2D model for the problem of the discharge of two tanks to the atmosphere

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Fig. 4

Scheme of the geometry of the 2D problem. L = 500 mm, D = 30 mm, a = 10 mm, b = 20 mm, c = 150 mm, d = 120 mm.

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Fig. 13

Mass flux through the exhaust port computed with different approaches. Speed: 6000 rev/min.

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Fig. 8

Area of the intake port as a function of the output shaft angle φ. The periods of chamber overlap are indicated. Leading chamber IPC (LIPC), trailing chamber IPO (TIPO).

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Fig. 9

Area of the exhaust port as a function of the output shaft angle φ. The periods of chamber overlap are indicated. Leading chamber EPC (LEPC), trailing chamber EPO (TEPO).

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Fig. 10

Pressure along the intake phase of a chamber. Speed: 6000 rev/min. The followed chamber is labeled with the number 1 and the overlapping chambers with the number 2.

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Fig. 14

Volumetric efficiency as a function of the engine speed

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Fig. 11

Pressure along the exhaust phase of a chamber. Speed: 6000 rev/min. The followed chamber is labeled with the number 1 and the overlapping chambers with the number 2.

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Fig. 12

Mass flux through the intake port computed with different approaches. Speed: 6000 rev/min.

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