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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Influence of Main Swirler Vane Angle on the Ignition Performance of TeLESS-II Combustor

[+] Author and Article Information
Bo Wang

National Key Laboratory of Science
and Technology on Aero-Engine
Aero-Thermodynamics,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, P.R.C.
e-mail: buaa_wangbo@126.com

Chi Zhang

National Key Laboratory of Science
and Technology on Aero-Engine
Aero-Thermodynamics,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, P.R.C.
e-mail: zhangchi@buaa.edu.cn

Yuzhen Lin

National Key Laboratory of Science
and Technology on Aero-Engine
Aero-Thermodynamics,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, P.R.C.
e-mail: linyuzhen@buaa.edu.cn

Xin Hui

National Key Laboratory of Science
and Technology on Aero-Engine
Aero-Thermodynamics,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, P.R.C.
e-mail: huixin@buaa.edu.cn

Jibao Li

AVIC Commercial Aircraft Engine Co., Ltd,
Shanghai 200241, China
e-mail: li9403@hotmail.com

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 10, 2016; final manuscript received June 18, 2016; published online August 16, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(1), 011501 (Aug 16, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1209; doi: 10.1115/1.4034154 History: Received June 10, 2016; Revised June 18, 2016

In order to balance the low emission and wide stabilization for lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion, the centrally staged layout is preferred in advanced aero-engine combustors. However, compared with the conventional combustor, it is more difficult for the centrally staged combustor to light up as the main stage air layer will prevent the pilot fuel droplets arriving at igniter tip. The goal of the present paper is to study the effect of the main stage air on the ignition of the centrally staged combustor. Two cases of the main swirler vane angle of the TeLESS-II combustor, 20 deg and 30 deg are researched. The ignition results at room inlet temperature and pressure show that the ignition performance of the 30 deg vane angle case is better than that of the 20 deg vane angle case. High-speed camera, planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), and computational fluids dynamics (CFD) are used to better understand the ignition results. The high-speed camera has recorded the ignition process, indicated that an initial kernel forms just adjacent the liner wall after the igniter is turned on, the kernel propagates along the radial direction to the combustor center and begins to grow into a big flame, and then it spreads to the exit of the pilot stage, and eventually stabilizes the flame. CFD of the cold flow field coupled with spray field is conducted. A verification of the CFD method has been applied with PLIF measurement, and the simulation results can qualitatively represent the experimental data in terms of fuel distribution. The CFD results show that the radial dimensions of the primary recirculation zone of the two cases are very similar, and the dominant cause of the different ignition results is the vapor distribution of the fuel. The concentration of kerosene vapor of the 30 deg vane angle case is much larger than that of the 20 deg vane angle case close to the igniter tip and along the propagation route of the kernel, therefore, the 30 deg vane angle case has a better ignition performance. For the consideration of the ignition performance, a larger main swirler vane angle of 30 deg is suggested for the better fuel distribution when designing a centrally staged combustor.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of TeLESS-II combustor

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Fig. 2

The single injector module combustor for ignition test

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Fig. 3

Definition of main swirler angle

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the ignition test system

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Fig. 5

Ignition test data of 30 deg vane case definition of ignition boundary

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Fig. 6

Comparison of ignition boundary of 20 deg vane case and 30 deg vane case

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Fig. 7

Optical rectangle liner of TeLESS-II combustor

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Fig. 8

Typical ignition photos of 30 deg vane case at conditionA

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Fig. 9

Schematic of the ignition process of TeLESS-II combustor

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Fig. 10

Average normalized fluorescence intensity of 30 deg vane case at 440 K and 2.5% total pressure drop

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Fig. 11

Simulated fuel distribution (kg/m3) of 30 deg vane case at 440 K and 2.5% total pressure drop

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Fig. 12

Velocity magnitude contour (m/s) and primary recirculation zone of 20 deg vane case at condition A

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Fig. 13

Velocity magnitude contour (m/s) and primary recirculation zone of 30 deg vane case condition A

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Fig. 14

Comparison of X-velocity at condition A

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Fig. 15

Velocity magnitude contour (m/s) of 20 deg vane case (left) and 30 deg vane case (right) at plane X = 50 mm

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Fig. 16

Kerosene liquid concentration of 20 deg vane case at condition A, unit in kg/m3

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Fig. 17

Kerosene liquid concentration of 30 deg vane case at condition A, unit in kg/m3

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Fig. 18

Kerosene vapor equivalence ratio distribution of 20 deg vane case at condition A

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Fig. 19

Kerosene vapor equivalence ratio distribution of 30 deg vane case at condition A

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Fig. 20

Comparison of kerosene vapor at condition A

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Fig. 21

Kerosene vapor equivalence ratio distribution of 20 deg vane case at condition B

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Fig. 22

Kerosene vapor equivalence ratio distribution of 30 deg vane case at condition B

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Fig. 23

Turbulence intensity distribution of 20 deg vane case, condition B

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Fig. 24

Turbulence intensity distribution of 30 deg vane case at condition B

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