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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Investigation on Flow-Induced Vibrations of a Steam Turbine Inlet Valve Considering Fluid–Structure Interaction Effects

[+] Author and Article Information
Clemens Bernhard Domnick

Chair of Turbomachinery,
University Duisburg-Essen,
Forsthausweg 2,
Duisburg 47057, Germany
e-mail: bernhard.domnick@uni-due.de

Friedrich-Karl Benra, Dieter Brillert, Hans Josef Dohmen

Chair of Turbomachinery,
University Duisburg-Essen,
Forsthausweg 2,
Duisburg 47057, Germany

Christian Musch

Siemens AG,
Mülheim an der Ruhr 45478, Germany

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 21, 2016; final manuscript received July 7, 2016; published online September 20, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.The content of this paper is copyrighted by Siemens Energy, Inc., and is licensed to ASME for publication and distribution only. Any inquiries regarding permission to use the content of this paper, in whole or in part, for any purpose must be addressed to Siemens Energy, Inc., directly.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(2), 022507 (Sep 20, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1260; doi: 10.1115/1.4034352 History: Received June 21, 2016; Revised July 07, 2016

The power output of steam turbines is controlled by steam turbine inlet valves. These valves have a large flow capacity and dissipate a huge amount of energy in throttled operation. The dissipation process generates strong pressure fluctuations resulting in high dynamic forces causing valve vibrations. A brief survey of the literature dealing with valve vibrations reveals that the vibrational problems and damages mostly occur in throttled operation when high speed jets, shocks, and shear layers are present. As previous investigations reveal that a feedback mechanism between the dynamic flow field and the vibrating valve plug exists, the vibrations are investigated with two-way coupled simulations. The fluid dynamics are solved with a scale-adaptive approach to resolve the pressure fluctuations generated by the turbulent flow. The finite element model (FEM) solving the structural dynamics considers both frictional effects at the valve packing and contact effects caused by the plug impacting on the valve bushing. As different flow topologies causing diverse dynamic loads exist, the fluid flow and the structural dynamics are simulated at different operating points. The simulations show that differences to the one-way-coupled approach exist leading to a change of the vibrational behavior. The physics behind the feedback mechanisms causing this change are analyzed and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the one-way-coupled approach are drawn.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Sketch of the valve (not to scale)

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Fig. 3

Sketch of the valve plug and the valve actuator (not to scale)

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Fig. 4

Observed flow topologies

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Fig. 5

Flow topology as a function of the operating conditions

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Fig. 6

Axial force spectra

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Fig. 7

Profiles of velocity and turbulent kinetic energy

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Fig. 8

RMS values of the dynamic forces

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Fig. 9

Transverse force spectra

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Fig. 10

Time courses of plug displacements

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Fig. 11

RMS displacements of the valve plug

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Fig. 12

Time course of the axial plug displacement and the axial force (two-way coupling)

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Fig. 13

Spectrum of the axial force acting on the valve plug

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Fig. 14

RMS forces acting on the valve plug

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Fig. 15

Time-averaged pressure distribution

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Fig. 16

Time-averaged velocity distributions

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Fig. 17

Time-averaged pressure profiles

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Fig. 18

Left: force vectors and direction of time-averaged displacement (one-way coupling); right: time course of plug displacement

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Fig. 19

Time course of the transverse force (two-way coupling)

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Fig. 20

Instantaneous velocity distributions (two-way coupling)

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Fig. 21

Time course of the plug displacement (two-way coupling)

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Fig. 22

RMS displacements of the valve plug

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Fig. 23

Spectrum of the axial force acting on the valve plug

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Fig. 24

RMS forces acting on the valve plug

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Fig. 25

Time- and circumferentially averaged velocity profile

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Fig. 26

Spectra of the force in the y-direction

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Fig. 27

Time courses of the plug displacements

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Fig. 28

RMS vibrations of the valve plug

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