0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Parallelized, Automated, and Predictive Imprint Cooling Model for Combustion Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Alejandro M. Briones

Energy and Environmental Engineering Division,
University of Dayton Research Institute,
Dayton, OH 45469
e-mail: alejandro.briones@udri.udayton.edu

Brent A. Rankin

Air Force Research Laboratory,
Wright–Patterson AFB,
Dayton, OH 45433
e-mail: brent.rankin.1@us.af.mil

Scott D. Stouffer

Energy and Environmental Engineering Division,
University of Dayton Research Institute,
Dayton, OH 45469
e-mail: scott.stouffer.ctr@us.af.mil

Timothy J. Erdmann

Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.,
Dayton, OH 45459
e-mail: timothy.erdmann.3.ctr@us.af.mil

David L. Burrus

Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.,
Dayton, OH 45459
e-mail: david.burrus.ctr@us.af.mil

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 28, 2016; final manuscript received June 30, 2016; published online September 27, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(3), 031505 (Sep 27, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1287; doi: 10.1115/1.4034499 History: Received June 28, 2016; Revised June 30, 2016

A novel parallelized, automated, and predictive imprint cooling model (PAPRICO) was developed for modeling of combustor liners using Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS). The methodology involves removing the film and effusion cooling jet geometry from the liner while retaining the cooling hole imprints on the liner. The PAPRICO can operate under two modalities, viz., two-sided and one-sided. For the two-sided PAPRICO model, the imprints are kept on the plenum and combustor sides of the liner. For the one-sided PAPRICO model, the imprints are retained only on the combustor side of the liner and there is no need for a plenum. The PAPRICO model neither needs a priori knowledge of the cooling flow rates through various combustor liner regions nor specific mesh partitioning. The imprint mass flow rate, momentum, enthalpy, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy dissipation rate are included in the governing equations as volumetric source terms in cells adjacent to the liner on the combustor side. Additionally, the two-sided PAPRICO model includes corresponding volumetric sinks in cells adjacent to the liner on the plenum side. A referee combustor liner was simulated using PAPRICO under nonreacting flow conditions. The PAPRICO results were compared against predictions of nonreacting flow results of a resolved liner geometry, against a combustor liner with prescribed mass and enthalpy source terms (simplified liner) and against measurements. The results clearly conclude that PAPRICO can qualitatively and quantitatively emulate the local turbulent flow field with a reduced mesh size. The simplified liner fails to emulate the local turbulent flow field.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

MPI critical section flowchart of the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) parallel program used to collect cells (c) within a jet imprint per imprint zone (z). The magenta boxes represent two consecutive nodes, viz., n and n + 1. The green and orange background within these boxes shows the portion of the algorithm that is necessary for parallel computing. The remaining flowchart callouts with blue background signify the part of the code that would be executed under serial computing. The flowchart components with orange background are the extra code that is executed by exclusive nodes in between the lowest and highest rank node that share the same imprint zone (z). The Marker(cell_id(c,z), ID) function groups the cells (c) within jet imprint, within imprint zone (z), and within compute node.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Portion of a partitioned mesh on the combustor liner. Two nodes are active in each mesh partition (blue and green). An imprint zone (z) is also illustrated containing 13 jet imprints. The imprint zone (red) is split in between two nodes as illustrated in (b). A jet imprint is partitioned between two compute nodes as illustrated in (c). The white line represents the surface mesh, while the gray line represents the partition. Note that the imprint in (c) is superimposed in both partitions.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Top and side view of (a) inward, (b) outward, (c) counterclockwise, and (d) clockwise tangential jet orientations. The light blue color indicates the imprints, and the blue vector indicates the orientation unit vector needed for the momentum source terms. For all the cases illustrated here, θjet  = 45 deg.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Isometric (top-left) and side (bottom-left) views of a portion of the combustor liner involving concentric effusion cooling patterns with jets oriented radially inward. (Right) Detailed engineering drawing.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Velocity magnitude contours on the centerplane computed using the (a) resolved liner geometry and (b) two-sided PAPRICO model discussed in the context of Fig. 5.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Velocity magnitude contours computed using the (a) resolved liner geometry and (b) two-sided PAPRICO model on a plane that is rotated by 7.5 deg with respect to that plane discussed in the context of Fig. 6. This plane is projected onto the paper, and the geometry wireframe is now visible (black lines).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Top view of the referee combustor liner illustrating the mass flow rate distribution over six regions, viz., (1) upstream cooling, (2) midsection cooling, (3) downstream cooling, (4), aft cooling, (5) primary dilution, and (6) secondary dilution.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Schematic of the computational domains for simulating the combustor liner using a (a) resolved geometry, (b) one-sided PAPRICO model, and (c) simplified geometry with prescribed mass and enthalpy sources. The boundary conditions are color-coded such that blue indicates pressure inlets; gray indicates walls; red indicates pressure outlets; magenta indicates the imprint effusion cooling holes for the PAPRICO model in (b); and orange, yellow, and green indicate surfaces with prescribed mass and enthalpy sources in (c).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparison among the (a) resolved liner geometry, (b) one-sided PAPRICO model, and (c) the simplified liner geometry with prescribed volumetric mass and enthalpy sources in terms of velocity magnitude flow field (left) and mixing time (right) discussed in the context of Fig. 9. The magenta line on the top image indicates the plane associated with this figure.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Comparison among the (a) resolved liner geometry, (b) one-sided PAPRICO model, and (c) the simplified liner geometry with prescribed mass and enthalpy sources in terms of velocity magnitude flow field (top) and turbulent mixing time (bottom) discussed in the context of Fig. 9 The magenta line on the top image indicates the plane associated with this figure.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In