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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Influence of Heat Transfer and Material Temperature on Combustion Instabilities in a Swirl Burner

[+] Author and Article Information
Christian Kraus

Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse,
UMR CNRS/INP-UPS 5502,
Toulouse 31400, France
e-mail: christian.kraus@imft.fr

Laurent Selle, Thierry Poinsot

Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse,
UMR CNRS/INP-UPS 5502,
Toulouse 31400, France

Christoph M. Arndt

Institute of Combustion Technology,
German Aerospace Center (DLR),
Stuttgart 70569, Germany

Henning Bockhorn

Engler-Bunte-Institute,
Combustion Technology,
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,
Karlsruhe 76131, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 4, 2016; final manuscript received August 30, 2016; published online December 21, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(5), 051503 (Dec 21, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1303; doi: 10.1115/1.4035143 History: Received July 04, 2016; Revised August 30, 2016

The current work focuses on the large eddy simulation (LES) of combustion instability in a laboratory-scale swirl burner. Air and fuel are injected at ambient conditions. Heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the plenums results in a preheating of the air and fuel flows above ambient conditions. The paper compares two computations: In the first computation, the temperature of the injected reactants is 300 K (equivalent to the experiment) and the combustor walls are treated as adiabatic. The frequency of the unstable mode (≈ 635 Hz) deviates significantly from the measured frequency (≈ 750 Hz). In the second computation, the preheating effect observed in the experiment and the heat losses at the combustion chamber walls are taken into account. The frequency (≈ 725 Hz) of the unstable mode agrees well with the experiment. These results illustrate the importance of accounting for heat transfer/losses when applying LES for the prediction of combustion instabilities. Uncertainties caused by unsuitable modeling strategies when using computational fluid dynamics for the prediction of combustion instabilities can lead to an improper design of passive control methods (such as Helmholtz resonators) as these are often only effective in a limited frequency range.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Swirl combustor with two air inlets and locations of microphone probes

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Fig. 2

Cut of the mesh in the middle plane. The domain is separated at the boundary patches for the perforated plates. The corresponding patches are coupled with the modified Howe model.

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Fig. 3

Modulus and phase of the reflection coefficient R of the combustion chamber outlet: —— Levine and Schwinger [31], – – – – AVBP with adequate relaxation coefficient

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Fig. 4

Reference temperatures (Tref) and constant temperature (Tiso) for the modeling of the heat losses at the combustion chamber walls

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Fig. 5

Axial locations of the extracted profiles

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Fig. 6

Time-averaged mean velocities in the experiment (•) and the LESs of case 1 (——) and case 2 (— ◻ —); x = distance to nozzle outlet

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Fig. 7

RMS of velocity fluctuations in the experiment (•) and the LESs of case 1 (——) and case 2 (— ◻ —); x = distance to nozzle outlet

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Fig. 8

Temperature profiles in the LESs of case 1 (——) and case 2 (— ◻ —); x = distance to nozzle outlet

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Fig. 9

Pressure spectra in the combustion chamber and the plenums in the experiment (——) and the LESs of case 1 (–. –. –) and case 2 (– – – –)

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Fig. 10

Time signal of pressure at the probe in the combustion chamber (——) and the integral heat release rate (– – – –)

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Fig. 11

Moduli and phases of the unstable modes in the LES of case 1 (f = 635 Hz, ) and the LES of case 2 (f = 725 Hz, •). Modulus and phase were extracted along the shown path in the outer plenum and the combustion chamber.

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Fig. 12

Average heat release rates in the LESs of cases 1 and 2 (2D cut in the middle of the combustion chamber)

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Fig. 13

Average line-of-sight integrated distributions of: the heat release rate in the LESs of cases 1 and 2 and the OH*-chemiluminescence of the flame in the experiment

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