0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Heat Transfer

Effect of Bolts on Flow and Heat Transfer in a Rotor–Stator Disk Cavity

[+] Author and Article Information
Sulfickerali Noor Mohamed

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: S.Noormohamed@surrey.ac.uk

John W. Chew

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: J.Chew@surrey.ac.uk

Nicholas J. Hills

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: N.Hills@surrey.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 12, 2016; final manuscript received August 25, 2016; published online January 4, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(5), 051901 (Jan 04, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1330; doi: 10.1115/1.4035144 History: Received July 12, 2016; Revised August 25, 2016

Previous studies have indicated some differences between steady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of flow in a rotor–stator disk cavity with rotating bolts compared to measurements. Recently, time-dependent CFD simulations have revealed the unsteadiness present in the flow and have given improved agreement with measurements. In this paper, unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) 360 deg model CFD calculations of a rotor–stator cavity with rotor bolts were performed in order to better understand the flow and heat transfer within a disk cavity previously studied experimentally by other workers. It is shown that the rotating bolts generate unsteadiness due to wake shedding which creates time-dependent flow patterns within the cavity. At low throughflow conditions, the unsteady flow significantly increases the average disk temperature. A systematic parametric study is presented giving insight into the influence of number of bolts, mass flow rate, cavity gap ratio, and the bolts-to-shroud gap ratio on the time-dependent flow within the cavity.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Bolt Windage Rig-University of Sussex (Coren [15]) and (b) bolt orientation with respect to direction of rotation (Miles [16])

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Boundary conditions and (b) distribution of grid points and (c) view of mesh near the bolts for 360 deg-18 bolts model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of nondimensional adiabatic rotor wall to inlet air temperature difference for 18 and 9 bolts cases from steady CFD, circumferential average data from URANS calculations and experimental data from Coren [15]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Contours of (a) instantaneous nondimensional swirl at x/s = 0.25 from the disk surface, (b) instantaneous wall heat flux after 40 disk rotations from unsteady CFD, and (c) circumferentially averaged local Nusselt number from steady and unsteady CFD models

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Contours of instantaneous (a) nondimensional swirl, (b) surface streamlines at x/s = 0.25 from the disk surface, and (c) nondimensional wall temperature after 40 disk revolutions for various bolt numbers

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Isosurface of Q-criterion for 3, 9, and 18 bolts cases

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Contour plot of flow angle at various times after 40 disk rotations—for various bolt numbers

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Circumferential variation of nondimensional radial velocity inboard of the bolts (r/b = 0.82, x/s = 0.4 from disk surface) after 40 disk rotations

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Instantaneous circumferential variation of static pressure on the casing surface—x/s = 0.25 from the disk surface after 40 disk revolutions for various bolt numbers

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Discrete Fourier transform of the pressure inboard of bolt B1 at r/b = 0.82, x/ = 0.4 from the disk surface (in the rotating frame) for various bolt numbers

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Contours of instantaneous (a) nondimensional swirl (b) surface streamlines at x/s = 0.25 and (c) nondimensional disk temperature after 40 disk revolutions for different bolts-to-shroud gap ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

(a) Instantaneous nondimensional swirl velocity inboard of bolt B1 and (b) circumferential variation of nondimensional radial velocity inboard of the bolts (r/b = 0.82, x/s = 0.4 from disk surface) for different bolt to shroud gap ratios

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Instantaneous circumferential variation of static pressure on the casing surface—x/s = 0.25 from the disk surface after 40 disk revolutions for different bolts-to-shroud gap ratios

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Discrete Fourier transform of the pressure inboard of bolt B1 at r/b = 0.82, x/ = 0.4 from the disk surface (in the rotating frame) for different bolts-to-shroud gap ratios

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Instantaneous nondimensional swirl velocity inboard of bolt B1 (r/b = 0.82, x/s = 0.4 from disk surface) for design gap ratio and double the design gap ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Influence of gap ratio on disk wall temperature profile—comparison of steady and unsteady CFD models for design gap ratio and double the design gap ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Contours of instantaneous (a) nondimensional swirl, (b) surface streamlines at x/s = 0.25 from the disk surface, and (c) nondimensional disk temperature after 40 disk revolutions for high mass flow case

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Instantaneous circumferential variation of nondimensional radial velocity inboard of bolts (r/b = 0.82, x/s = 0.4 from disk surface) after 40 disk rotations

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Discrete Fourier transform of the pressure inboard of bolt B1 at r/ = 0.82, x/ = 0.4 from the disk surface (in the rotating frame) from low and high throughflow cases

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In