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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Study of Starting Problem of Axisymmetric Divergent Dual Throat Nozzle

[+] Author and Article Information
Yangsheng Wang

Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of
Aerospace Power System,
College of Energy and Power Engineering,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics (NUAA),
Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016, China
e-mail: wangyansheng106@nuaa.edu.cn

Jinglei Xu

Professor
Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory
of Aerospace Power System,
College of Energy and Power Engineering,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics (NUAA),
Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016, China
e-mail: xujl@nuaa.edu.cn

Shuai Huang

Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory
of Aerospace Power System,
College of Energy and Power Engineering,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics (NUAA),
Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016, China
e-mail: huangshuaixp@126.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 21, 2016; final manuscript received September 25, 2016; published online January 18, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Eric Petersen.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(6), 062602 (Jan 18, 2017) (13 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1255; doi: 10.1115/1.4035230 History: Received June 21, 2016; Revised September 25, 2016

Compared to the conventional axisymmetric dual throat nozzle, the axisymmetric divergent dual throat nozzle (ADDTN) can offer larger thrust vector angles. However, the starting problem maybe exists in the ADDTN and results in a huge thrust loss. In this paper, the ADDTN starting problem has been studied by steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The effects of nozzle geometric parameters on internal nozzle performance have been discussed in detail, including cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle, cavity length, expansion ratio, rounding radius at the nozzle throat, and rounding radius at the cavity bottom. And, the shock oscillation phenomenon is found inside the recessed cavity in some high-expansion ratio configurations. In addition, a bypass is proposed in this study to solve the ADDTN starting problem. The main numerical simulation results show that the expansion ratio is the most sensitive parameter affecting the starting characteristic of ADDTN, followed by the cavity divergence angle and the cavity length. And, among these parameters, the parameters of cavity convergence angle and rounding radius at the cavity bottom contribute the least to the starting problem. Besides, the ADDTN configurations of large rounding radius at the nozzle throat tend to start.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Topics: Nozzles , Cavities
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of the Dual Throat Nozzle

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Fig. 2

Configuration of ADDTN

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Fig. 3

(a) Mach contour of simulation by NASA and (b) Mach contour of simulation by RKE model

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Fig. 4

Comparison of experimental and computational upper surface pressure

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Fig. 5

Computational domain with boundary conditions

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Fig. 6

Computational mesh: (a) computational mesh for the domain and (b) zoomed in computational mesh at the nozzle

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Fig. 7

Pressure distributions of different grids on the internal nozzle wall

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Fig. 8

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 10-30-1.05-3, (b) 13-30-1.05-3, and (c) 16-30-1.05-3

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Fig. 9

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 10-50-1.1-2, (b) 13-50-1.1-2, and (c) 16-50-1.1-2

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Fig. 10

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 10-50-1.2-2, (b) 13-50-1.2-2, and (c) 16-50-1.2-2

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Fig. 11

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 10-50-1.4-2.5, (b) 13-50-1.4-2.5, and (c) 16-50-1.4-2.5

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Fig. 12

Mach Contours of low-expansion ratio ADDTN: (a) 13-30-1.05-2, (b) 13-40-1.05-2, and (c) 13-50-1.05-2

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Fig. 13

Mach Contours of high-expansion ratio ADDTN: (a) 13-30-1.4-2.5, (b) 13-40-1.4-2.5, and (c) 13-50-1.4-2.5

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Fig. 14

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 13-40-1.1-2, (b) 13-40-1.1-2.5, (c) 13-40-1.1-3, (d) 13-50-1.1-2, (e) 13-50-1.1-2.5, (f)13-50-1.1-3

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Fig. 15

Mach Contours of A2 / A1  = 1.1025 configurations: (a) 10-50-1.05-2, (b) 10-50-1.05-2.5, and (c) 10-50-1.05-3

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Fig. 16

Mach Contours of high-expansion ratio ADDTN: (a) 16-40-1.4-2, (b) 16-40-1.4-2.5 and (c) 16-40-1.4-3

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Fig. 17

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 13-50-1.05-2, (b) 13-50-1.1-2, (c) 13-50-1.2-2, and (d) 13-50-1.4-2

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Fig. 18

Mach Contours of the ADDTN: (a) 16-50-1.1-2 and (b) 13-50-1.1-2.5

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Fig. 19

Effect of Rt on internal nozzle performance: (a) Cf - Rt and (b) Cd - Rt

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Fig. 20

Mach Contours of different Rt configurations: (a) Rt = 0, (b) Rt = 4, and (c) Rt = 8

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Fig. 21

Different Rz configurations of ADDTN

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Fig. 22

Effect of Rz on internal nozzle performance: (a) Cf - Rz and (b) Cd - Rz

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Fig. 23

Mach Contours of different Rz configurations: Rz = 5, (b) Rz = 15, and (c) Rz = 25

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Fig. 24

The variation history of mass flow rate

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Fig. 25

Mach Contours of configuration 10-50-1.2-2.5 in one period: (a) 0(T), (b) 0.25(T), (c) 0.5(T), and (d) 0.75(T)

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Fig. 26

Sketch of the bypass in ADDTN

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Fig. 27

Comparison of Mach contours of different nozzle: (a) unstarting and (b) started

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