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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

High-Frequency Thermoacoustic Modulation Mechanisms in Swirl-Stabilized Gas Turbine Combustors—Part I: Experimental Investigation of Local Flame Response

[+] Author and Article Information
Frederik M. Berger

Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: berger@td.mw.tum.de

Tobias Hummel

Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
Institute for Advanced Study,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: hummel@td.mw.tum.de

Michael Hertweck

Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: hertweck@td.mw.tum.de

Jan Kaufmann

Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: kaufmannjan@gmail.com

Bruno Schuermans

Institute for Advanced Study,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
GE Power,
Baden 5401, Switzerland
e-mail: bruno.schuermans@ge.com

Thomas Sattelmayer

Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik,
Technische Universität München,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: sattelmayer@td.mw.tum.de

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 11, 2016; final manuscript received November 22, 2016; published online February 14, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(7), 071501 (Feb 14, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1323; doi: 10.1115/1.4035591 History: Received July 11, 2016; Revised November 22, 2016

This paper presents the experimental approach for determination and validation of noncompact flame transfer functions of high-frequency, transverse combustion instabilities observed in a generic lean premixed gas turbine combustor. The established noncompact transfer functions describe the interaction of the flame's heat release with the acoustics locally, which is necessary due to the respective length scales being of the same order of magnitude. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the flame are measured by imaging the OH chemiluminescence signal, phase-locked to the dynamic pressure at the combustor's front plate. Radon transforms provide a local insight into the flame's modulated reaction zone. Applied to different burner configurations, the impact of the unsteady heat release distribution on the thermoacoustic driving potential, as well as distinct flame regions that exhibit high modulation intensity, is revealed. Utilizing these spatially distributed transfer functions within thermoacoustic analysis tools (addressed in this joint publication's Part II) allows then to predict transverse linear stability of gas turbine combustors.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the experimental setup with imaging unit and depiction of instrumentation ports on the faceplate

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Fig. 2

Postprocessing procedure of the image and pressure time series

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Fig. 3

(a) Hilbert transformed acoustic pressure and (b) simultaneously sampled image acquisition signals (II—image intensifier)

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Fig. 4

Proportionality of measured OH CL intensity with thermal power

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Fig. 5

Sample mean heat release and derived temperature distribution

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Fig. 6

(a) Hilbert transformed pressure signal H(t) with envelopes and (b) distributions of H(t) ; (c) frequency spectrum of the raw pressure signal p(t); and (d) distribution of the envelope |H(t)|

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Fig. 7

Low swirl phase averaged line-of-sight OH CL for high ϕk=0 and low ϕk=π oscillation amplitude at reference location

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Fig. 8

Low swirl oscillating intensity 〈I′〉ϕk for r = [0, R] (circles) and r = [0, −R] (squares) phase-locked image half with standard errors (dashed curves)

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Fig. 9

Phase and real part distribution of the tomographic reconstruction for the low swirl configuration heat release oscillation q˙′(x,r)

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Fig. 10

(a) Computational results of displacement and density FTF for the low swirl configuration and (b) corresponding computational displacement and pressure field

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Fig. 11

Experimental heat release oscillations for low (S1) and high (S2) swirl configurations compared to their numerical counterparts

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Fig. 12

Heat release oscillation isocontour (solid line) and dynamic pressure distribution with dashed isocontour for low (S1) and high (S2) swirl configurations

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