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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei Jing

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7910
e-mail: wjing2@ncsu.edu

Zengyang Wu

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7910
e-mail: zwu7@ncsu.edu

William L. Roberts

Clean Combustion Research Center,
King Abdullah University of
Science and Technology,
Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: william.roberts@kaust.edu.sa

Tiegang Fang

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7910
e-mail: tfang2@ncsu.edu

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 14, 2017; final manuscript received March 5, 2017; published online April 25, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 139(10), 102803 (Apr 25, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1055; doi: 10.1115/1.4036292 History: Received February 14, 2017; Revised March 05, 2017

Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement was implemented by two-color pyrometry under quiescent type diesel engine conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration). Different fuel quantities, which correspond to different injection widths from 0.5 ms to 2 ms under constant injection pressure (1000 bar), were used to simulate different loads in engines. For a given fuel, soot temperature and KL factor show a different trend at initial stage for different fuel quantities, where a higher soot temperature can be found in a small fuel quantity case. but a higher KL factor is observed in a large fuel quantity case generally. Another difference occurs at the end of combustion due to the termination of fuel injection. Additionally, BTL flame has a lower soot temperature, especially under a larger fuel quantity (2 ms injection width). Meanwhile, average soot level is lower for BTL flame, especially under a lower fuel quantity (0.5 ms injection width). BTL shows an overall low sooting behavior with low soot temperature compared to diesel; however, trade-off between soot level and soot temperature needs to be carefully selected when different loads are used.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental system: 1—fuel injector, 2—exhaust line, 3—chamber body, 4—quatz window, 5—plug/window retainer, 6—pressure transducer, 7—intake line, 8—metal plug, 9—spark plug, 10—combustion chamber, 11—double-image lens, 12—narrowband filters (550 nm and 650 nm, both 10 nm FWHM), and 13—high-speed cameras

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Fig. 2

Soot temperature and KL factor at the early stage for two different fuel quantities: (a) soot temperature at small quantity, (b) soot temperature at large quantity, (c) KL factor at small quantity, and (d) KL factor at large quantity

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Fig. 3

Soot temperature and KL factor at the developing stage for two different fuel quantities: (a) soot temperature at small quantity, (b) soot temperature at large quantity, (c) KL factor at small quantity, and (d) KL factor at large quantity

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Fig. 4

Soot temperature and KL factor at the end of combustion stage for two different fuel quantities: (a) soot temperature at small quantity, (b) soot temperature at large quantity, (c) KL factor at small quantity, (d) KL factor at large quantity

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Fig. 5

Time-resolved results for BTL at five fuel quantities: average soot temperature (a) and average KL factor (b)

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Fig. 6

Time-resolved results for diesel: average soot temperature (a) and average KL factor (b)

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Fig. 7

Time-resolved results for both fuels at small quantity (0.5 ms) and large quantity (2.0 ms): average soot temperature (a) and average KL factor (b)

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