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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Modal Analyses of an Axial Turbine Blisk With Intentional Mistuning

[+] Author and Article Information
Bernd Beirow

Mem. ASME
Chair of Structural Mechanics and
Vehicle Vibrational Technology,
Brandenburg University of Technology,
Siemens-Halske-Ring 14,
Cottbus D-03046, Germany
e-mail: beirow@b-tu.de

Felix Figaschewsky

Chair of Structural Mechanics and
Vehicle Vibrational Technology,
Brandenburg University of Technology,
Siemens-Halske-Ring 14,
Cottbus D-03046, Germany
e-mail: Felix.figascheswky@b-tu.de

Arnold Kühhorn

Mem. ASME
Chair of Structural Mechanics and
Vehicle Vibrational Technology,
Brandenburg University of Technology,
Siemens-Halske-Ring 14,
Cottbus D-03046, Germany
e-mail: kuehhorn@b-tu.de

Alfons Bornhorn

MAN Diesel & Turbo SE,
Stadtbachstr. 1, Augsburg,
Bayern D-86153, Germany
e-mail: Alfons.Bornhorn@man.eu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 3, 2017; final manuscript received July 5, 2017; published online September 19, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(1), 012503 (Sep 19, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1260; doi: 10.1115/1.4037588 History: Received July 03, 2017; Revised July 05, 2017

The potential of intentional mistuning to reduce the maximum forced response is analyzed within the development of an axial turbine blisk for ship diesel engine turbocharger applications. The basic idea of the approach is to provide an increased aerodynamic damping level for particular engine order (EO) excitations and mode shapes without any significant distortions of the aerodynamic performance. The mistuning pattern intended to yield a mitigation of the forced response is derived from an optimization study applying genetic algorithms. Two blisk prototypes have been manufactured a first one with and another one without employing intentional mistuning. Hence, the differences regarding the real mistuning and other modal properties can be experimentally determined and evaluated as well. In addition, the experimental data basis allows for updating structural models which are well suited to compute the forced response under operational conditions. In this way, the real benefit achieved with the application of intentional mistuning is demonstrated.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Mistuning testing of a blisk prototype

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Fig. 2

Blade mode shapes 1−3

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Fig. 3

Campbell-diagram (rotational and temperature effects considered)

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Fig. 4

Frequency mistuning of blade mode 1: (a) intentionally mistuned and (b) regular blisk

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Fig. 5

Piezoelectric excitation of the blisk in a vacuum chamber piezoelectric excitation of the blisk in a vacuum chamber

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Fig. 6

Normalized FRFs (BF 1) at 1000 mbar, (a) intentionally mistuned and (b) regular blisk

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Fig. 7

MultiDOFs-fit of normalized FRFs (BF 1), intentionally mistuned blisk (blade 26), (a) at 1000 mbar and (b) at 1 mbar

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Fig. 8

Normalized modal damping ratios for BF 1 (regular blisk, only blade 1 considered)

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Fig. 9

Normalized modal damping ratios for BF 1−3 (solid: intentionally mistuned and dotted: regular blisk)

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Fig. 10

Measured and computed mode shape involutes at LE tip (BF 1, intentionally mistuned blisk)

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Fig. 11

DFT of measured modes (BF 1, intentionally mistuned blisk)

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Fig. 12

Measured and computed mode shape involutes at LE tip (BF 1, regular blisk)

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Fig. 13

DFT of measured modes (BF 1, regular blisk)

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Fig. 14

Normalized aerodynamic damping (BF 1, 90% speed)

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Fig. 15

Maximum displacement magnification compared to the tuned reference (BF 1, EO 6, 90% speed)

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Fig. 16

Maximum ODS (BF 1, EO 6, 90% speed), (a) tuned, (b) tuned measured (regular), (c) optimum intentional mistuning, and (d) measured intentional mistuning

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Fig. 17

Traveling wave mode contribution to maximum ODS (BF 1, EO 6, 90% speed), (a) tuned, (b) tuned measured (regular), (c) optimum intentional mistuning, and (d) measured intentional mistuning

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