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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Dynamic and Thermal Analysis of Rotor Drop on Sleeve Type Catcher Bearings in Magnetic Bearing Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiao Kang

Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843
e-mail: kangxiao1990@tamu.edu

Alan Palazzolo

Fellow ASME
James J. Cain Professor I
Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843
e-mail: a-palazzolo@tamu.edu

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 3, 2017; final manuscript received July 10, 2017; published online October 3, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(2), 022501 (Oct 03, 2017) (15 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1269; doi: 10.1115/1.4037666 History: Received July 03, 2017; Revised July 10, 2017

The catcher bearing (CB) is a crucial part of the magnetic bearing system. It can support the rotor when the magnetic bearing is shut down or malfunctioning and limit the rotor's position when large vibration occurs. The sleeve bearing has the advantages of a relatively large contact surface area, simple structure, and an easily replaced surface. There are already many applications of the sleeve type CBs in the industrial machinery supported by the magnetic bearings. Few papers though provide thorough investigations into the dynamic and thermal responses of the sleeve bearing in the role of a CB. This paper develops a coupled two-dimensional (2D) elastic deformation—heat transfer finite element model of the sleeve bearing acting as a CB. A coulomb friction model is used to model the friction force between the rotor and the sleeve bearing. The contact force and 2D temperature distribution of the sleeve bearing are obtained by numerical integration. To validate the finite element method (FEM) code developed by the author, first, the mechanical and thermal static analysis results of the sleeve bearing model are compared with the results calculated by the commercial software solidworks simulation. Second, the transient analysis numerical results are compared with the rotor drop test results in reference. Additionally, this paper explores the influences of different surface lubrication conditions, different materials on rotor-sleeve bearing's dynamic and thermal behavior. This paper lays the foundation of the fatigue life calculation of the sleeve bearing and provides the guideline for the sleeve type CB design.

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References

Gelin, A. , Pugnet, J. M. , and Hagopian, J. D. , 1990, “ Dynamic Behavior of Flexible Rotors With Active Magnetic Bearings on Safety Auxiliary Bearings,” Third International Conference on Rotor Dynamics, Lyon, France, Sept. 10–12, pp. 503–508.
Ishii, T. , and Kirk, R. G. , 1996, “ Transient Response Technique Applied to Active Magnetic Bearing Machinery During Rotor Drop,” ASME J. Vib. Acoust., 118(2), pp. 154–163. [CrossRef]
Sun, G. , Palazzolo, A. , Provenza, A. , and Montague, G. , 2004, “ Detailed Ball Bearing Model for Magnetic Suspension Auxiliary Service,” J. Sound Vib., 269(3), pp. 933–963.
Sun, G. , 2006, “ Rotor Drop and Following Thermal Growth Simulations Using Detailed Auxiliary Bearing and Damper Models,” J. Sound Vib., 289(1), pp. 334–359. [CrossRef]
Lee, J. G. , and Palazzolo, A. , 2012, “ Catcher Bearing Life Prediction Using a Rainflow Counting Approach,” ASME J. Tribol., 134(3), p. 031101. [CrossRef]
Wilkes, J. , Moore, J. , Ransom, D. , and Vannini, G. , 2013, “ An Improved Catcher Bearing Model and an Explanation of the Forward Whirl/Whip Phenomenon Observed in Active Magnetic Bearing Transient Drop Experiments,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 136(4), p. 042504. [CrossRef]
Penfield, S. R. , Jr., and Rodwell, E. , 2001, “Auxiliary Bearing Design Considerations for Gas Cooled Reactors,” International Atomic Energy Agency, Palo Alto, CA, Report No. IAEA-TECDOC–1238.
Swanson, E. E. , Raju, K. V. S. , and Kirk, R. G. , 1996, “ Test Results and Numerical Simulation of AMB Rotor Drop,” Sixth International Conference on Vibrations in Rotating Machine, Sept. 9–12, pp. 119–131.
Swanson, E. E. , and Kirk, R. G. , 1995, “ AMB Rotor Drop Initial Transient on Ball and Solid Bearings,” Magnetic Bearings, Magnetic Drives and Dry Gas Seals, Conference & Exhibition (MAG), Alexandria, VA, Aug. 10–11, pp. 227–235.
Wilkes, J. C. , and Allison, T. A. , 2015, “ General Model for Two-Point Contact Dry-Friction Whip and Whirl: Further Advancements and Experimental Test Results,” ASME Paper No. GT2015-43815.
Palazzolo, A. , 2016, Vibration Theory and Applications With Finite Elements and Active Vibration Control, Wiley, Chichester, UK. [CrossRef]
Reddy, J. N. , 2005, Finite Element Method, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York.
Oberg, E. , Jones, F. D. , Horton, H. L. , and Ryffel, H. H. , 1990, Machinery's Handbook, 23rd ed., Industrial Press, New York.
Norton, R. L. , 1994, Machine Design: An Integrated Approach, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Figures

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Fig. 1

Plane strain model of the sleeve bearing

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Fig. 2

Mesh check in Matlab for the plane strain model of the sleeve bearing

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Fig. 3

Mesh, constrain, and force direction (a) plane strain model by author and (b) solidworks three-dimensional (3D) element model

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Fig. 4

Displacements of node 1 versus applied force

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Fig. 5

Mesh, constrain and heat source: (a) 2D thermal model by author and (b) solidworks 3D element model

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Fig. 6

Temperature of node 1 versus applied heat

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Fig. 7

Temperature distribution when the applied heat power is 900 W: (a) 2D FEM thermal model by author and (b) 3D FEM model by solidworks simulation

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Fig. 8

Rotor geometry in Ref. [8]

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Fig. 9

Rotor drop onto lubricated bronze type sleeve bearing with low imbalance: (a) simulation results and (b) test results

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Fig. 10

Rotor drop onto unlubricated bronze type sleeve bearing with low imbalance: (a) simulation results and (b) test results

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Fig. 11

Rotor drop onto lubricated bronze type sleeve bearing with high imbalance: (a) simulation results and (b) test results

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Fig. 12

Rotor drop onto lubricated bronze type sleeve bearing with high imbalance: (a) simulation results and (b) test results

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Fig. 13

Rotor geometry and catcher bearing location

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Fig. 14

Rotor orbit with different dynamic friction coefficients

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Fig. 15

Rotor whirling speed when the friction coefficient is 0.4

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Fig. 16

Contact force with different friction coefficients: (a) μd=0.15, (b) μd=0.3, and (c) μd=0.4

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Fig. 17

Maximum von Mises stress time history with different friction coefficients

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Fig. 18

Von Mises stress distribution when the largest von Mises stress occurs: (a) μd=0.15, (b) μd=0.3, and (c) μd=0.4

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Fig. 19

Time histories of peak temperature with different friction coefficients

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Fig. 20

Temperature distribution with different friction coefficients: (a) μd=0.15, (b) μd=0.3, and (c) μd=0.4

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Fig. 21

Rotor whiling frequency and rotor spin speed

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Fig. 22

Rotor spin speeds with different lubrication conditions

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Fig. 23

Rotor orbits with different materials, (a) aluminum, (b) bronze, (c) steel

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Fig. 24

Rotor whiling speed, (a) aluminum, (b) steel

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Fig. 25

Normal contact force with different materials: (a) aluminum, (b) bronze, and (c) steel

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Fig. 26

Maximum von Mises stress time history with different materials

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Fig. 27

Maximum von Mises stress with different materials: (a) aluminum, (b) bronze, and (c) steel

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Fig. 28

Variation of the peak temperature with different materials under unlubricated conditions

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Fig. 29

Temperature distribution with different materials: (a) aluminum, (b) bronze, and (c) steel

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