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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Numerical Study of Cage Dynamics Focused on Hydrodynamic Effects of Guidance Land Clearances for Different Ball-Pocket Clearances in Cryogenic Environments

[+] Author and Article Information
Bokseong Choe

Center of Urban Energy System Research,
Korea Institute of Science and Technology,
Seongbuk-gu,
Seoul 02792, South Korea
e-mail: bschoe@kist.re.kr

Jeonkook Lee

Center for Opto-Electronic Materials and Devices,
Korea Institute of Science and Technology,
Seongbuk-gu,
Seoul 02792, South Korea
e-mail: jkleemc@kist.re.kr

Doyoung Jeon

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Sogang University,
Mapo-gu,
Seoul 04107, South Korea
e-mail: dyjeon@sogang.ac.kr

Yongbok Lee

Center of Urban Energy System Research,
Korea Institute of Science and Technology,
Seongbuk-gu,
Seoul 02792, South Korea
e-mail: lyb@kist.re.kr

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 10, 2017; final manuscript received July 20, 2017; published online November 7, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(4), 042502 (Nov 07, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1327; doi: 10.1115/1.4037872 History: Received July 10, 2017; Revised July 20, 2017

This study presents the dynamic motion of a ball bearing cage submerged in a cryogenic fluid under high-speed conditions. The dynamic motion of the cage has been studied as a function of the race land-cage and ball-cage pocket clearances for different inner race rotation speeds under light load conditions. In addition, this study conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using commercial software to analyze the fluid dynamic forces on the cage. The hydraulic force obtained from the CFD analysis was coded in commercial ball bearing analysis software as a function of the eccentricity ratio and rotation speed of the cage. Finally, the dynamic motion of the ball bearing cage considering the effects of fluid dynamic forces has been studied. The results include the cage whirling amplitude, fluctuation of cage whirling speed, and cage wear for various cage clearances and rotation speeds. The cage whirling amplitude decreases as the outer guidance clearance decreases, and it decreases as the rotation speed increases up to 11,000 rpm because of the increasing hydrodynamic force of the liquid nitrogen (LN2). However, the probability density function curves indicate that an increase in the rotor speed increases the standard deviation in the cage whirling frequency. The wear loss of the cage was greatest for the largest race land-cage and the smallest ball-cage pocket clearances. Consequently, the analysis results for various operating conditions (inner race rotation speeds, cage clearances, traction coefficients, etc.) are in good agreement with the reference results.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of ball bearing with virtual rotor, boundary conditions, and feature shape information for analysis

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Fig. 2

Forces acting on ball bearing elements

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Fig. 3

Radial and tangential forces acting on the cage by hydraulic force

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Fig. 4

Grid generation and boundary condition for computational domain

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Fig. 5

Grid independence determination with radial and tangential force convergence for inlet = 0.1 kg/s, outlet = 0.25 MPa, and cage rotation speed = 4620 rpm

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Fig. 6

Radial forces acting on cage for various cage rotation speeds and eccentricity ratios: (a) Cdg = 1.14 mm and (b) Cdg = 0.74 mm

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Fig. 7

Tangential forces acting on cage for various cage rotation speeds and eccentricity ratios: (a) Cdg = 1.14 mm and (b) Cdg = 0.74 mm

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Fig. 8

Hypothetical traction-slip model for traction coefficient of solid lubricant as a function of slip velocity

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Fig. 9

Analysis results of cage orbit for various inner race speeds and guidance clearances (inner race rotation speeds: 5000–11,000 rpm; guidance clearances: 0.74 and 1.14 mm; ball-cage pocket clearance: 1.22 mm; traction coefficient: 0.05)

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Fig. 10

Analysis results of cage orbit for various guidance clearances and traction coefficients (inner race rotation speed: 8000 rpm; guidance clearances: 0.74 mm and 1.14 mm; ball-cage pocket clearance: 1.22 mm; traction coefficients: 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15)

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Fig. 11

Wear rates of cage for various guidance clearances and inner race speeds: (a) Kc = 0.05, (b) Kc = 0.10, and (c) Kc = 0.15

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Fig. 12

Ratio of cage whirling/inner race rotation frequencies for various guidance clearances and traction coefficients

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Fig. 13

Analysis results of cage orbit for various inner race rotation speeds and guidance clearances (inner race rotation speeds: 5000–11,000 rpm; ball-cage pocket clearances: 0.74 mm and 1.14 mm; guidance clearance: 0.74 mm; traction coefficient: 0.05)

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Fig. 14

Analysis results of cage orbit for various ball-cage pocket clearances and traction coefficients (inner race rotation speed: 8000 rpm; ball-cage pocket clearances: 0.62 mm and 1.82 mm; guidance clearance: 1.22 mm; traction coefficients: 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15)

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Fig. 15

Wear rates of cage for various ball-cage pocket clearances and inner race rotation speeds: (a) Kc = 0.05, (b) Kc = 0.10, and (c) Kc = 0.15

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Fig. 16

Ratio of cage whirling/inner race rotation frequencies for different ball-cage pocket clearances and traction coefficients

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