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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

The Influence of Carrier Air Preheating on Autoignition of Inline-Injected Hydrogen–Nitrogen Mixtures in Vitiated Air of High Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Christoph A. Schmalhofer

German Aerospace Center (DLR),
Institute of Combustion Technology,
Pfaffenwaldring 38-40,
Stuttgart 70569, Germany
e-mail: Christoph.Schmalhofer@dlr.de

Peter Griebel

German Aerospace Center (DLR),
Institute of Combustion Technology,
Pfaffenwaldring 38-40,
Stuttgart 70569, Germany
e-mail: Peter.Griebel@dlr.de

Manfred Aigner

German Aerospace Center (DLR),
Institute of Combustion Technology,
Pfaffenwaldring 38-40,
Stuttgart 70569, Germany
e-mail: Manfred.Aigner@dlr.de

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 3, 2017; final manuscript received July 24, 2017; published online October 17, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(3), 031502 (Oct 17, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1255; doi: 10.1115/1.4037918 History: Received July 03, 2017; Revised July 24, 2017

The use of highly reactive hydrogen-rich fuels in lean premixed combustion systems strongly affects the operability of stationary gas turbines (GT) resulting in higher autoignition and flashback risks. The present study investigates the autoignition behavior and ignition kernel evolution of hydrogen–nitrogen fuel mixtures in an inline co-flow injector configuration at relevant reheat combustor operating conditions. High-speed luminosity and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in an optically accessible reheat combustor are employed. Autoignition and flame stabilization limits strongly depend on temperatures of vitiated air and carrier preheating. Higher hydrogen content significantly promotes the formation and development of different types of autoignition kernels: More autoignition kernels evolve with higher hydrogen content showing the promoting effect of equivalence ratio on local ignition events. Autoignition kernels develop downstream a certain distance from the injector, indicating the influence of ignition delay on kernel development. The development of autoignition kernels is linked to the shear layer development derived from global experimental conditions.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Optically accessible reheat combustor at DLR Stuttgart

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the co-flow in-line injector configuration in the MS

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Fig. 3

Autoignition and flame stabilization limits for different carrier preheating temperatures

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Fig. 4

Global distribution of the first and stabilizing kernels in the mixing section for different carrier air preheating temperatures

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Fig. 5

Global distribution (side view) of the subsequent kernels in the MS for different carrier air preheating temperatures TC: (a) TC = 303 K, (b) TC = 523 K, (c) TC = 573 K, (d) TC = 623 K, (e) TC = 703 K

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Distribution in x-direction (side view) of the first (×) and stabilizing (▲) kernels for different carrier air preheating temperatures as function of MS temperature TMS (a, c, e) and as function of hydrogen volume fraction XH2 (b, d, f): (a) TC = 303 K, (b) TC = 303 K, (c) TC = 573 K, (d) TC = 573 K, (e) TC = 623 K, and (f) TC = 623 K

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Fig. 7

Distribution in Y-direction (side view) of the first (×) and stabilizing (▲) Kernels and upper (+) and lower (*) shear layer boundaries for different carrier air preheating temperatures as function of MS temperature TMS (a, c, e) and as function of hydrogen volume fraction XH2 (b, d, f): (a) TC = 303 K, (b) TC = 303 K, (c) TC = 573 K, (d) TC = 573 K, (e) TC = 623 K, and (f) TC = 623 K

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Fig. 8

Velocity distribution (top: average values, bottom: root-mean-square-values) in x-y-plane from PIV measurements. White lines indicate the development of the inner boundaries of the inner shear layer between fuel and carrier flow (short dashed lines) and the outer shear layer between carrier and hot gas flow (long dashed lines) according to Ref.[14].

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