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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

On the Influence of Lubricant Supply Conditions and Bearing Configuration to the Performance of (Semi) Floating Ring Bearing Systems for Turbochargers

[+] Author and Article Information
Luis San Andrés

Fellow ASME
Mast-Childs Chair Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843
e-mail: Lsanandres@tamu.edu

Feng Yu

Honghua America, LLC,
Houston, TX 77053

Kostandin Gjika

Honeywell Transportation Systems,
Thaon-les-Vosges 88155, France

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 5, 2017; final manuscript received July 25, 2017; published online October 17, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(3), 032503 (Oct 17, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1298; doi: 10.1115/1.4037920 History: Received July 05, 2017; Revised July 25, 2017

Engine oil-lubricated (semi) floating ring bearing ((S)FRB) systems in passenger vehicle turbochargers (TC) operate at temperatures well above ambient and must withstand large temperature gradients that can lead to severe thermomechanical induced stresses. Physical modeling of the thermal energy flow paths and an effective thermal management strategy are paramount to determine safe operating conditions ensuring the TC component mechanical integrity and the robustness of its bearing system. The paper details a model to predict the pressure and temperature fields and the distribution of thermal energy flows in a bearing system. The impact of lubricant supply conditions, bearing film clearances, and oil supply grooves is quantified. Either a low oil temperature or a high supply pressure increases the generated shear power. Either a high supply pressure or a large clearance allows more flow through the inner film and draws more heat from the hot journal, thought it increases the shear drag power as the oil viscosity remains high. Nonetheless, the peak temperature of the inner film is not influenced by the changes on the way the oil is supplied into the film as the thermal energy displaced from the hot shaft into the film is overwhelming. Adding axial grooves on the inner side of the (S)FRB improves its dynamic stability, albeit increasing the drawn oil flow as well as the drag power and heat from the shaft. The results identify a compromise between different parameters of groove designs thus enabling a bearing system with a low power consumption.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of energy flows in a turbocharger [1]

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Fig. 2

Schematic views of floating ring bearing system [10]

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Fig. 3

Distribution of inner film temperature versus angle (θ) at the inlet (z = 0) and ½ plane (zi = ¼ Li). Three oil inlet temperature (TSUP) conditions. Operation at nominal PSUP and at maximum shaft speed.

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Fig. 4

Peak and average temperatures of inner and outer films versus oil supply temperature. Operation at nominal PSUP under a constant static load and at maximum shaft speed.

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Fig. 5

Flow rates through inner film (top) and outer film (bottom) versus shaft speed for three oil inlet temperatures (TSUP). Operation at nominal supply pressure (PSUP) with constant static load.

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Fig. 6

Drag power loss (% fraction) versus oil inlet pressure (PSUP) and versus four shaft speeds (N). Operation at nominal condition.

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Fig. 7

Heat flows carried by films (inner and outer) and heat conducted into the bearing casing versus shaft speed. Three instances of oil inlet pressure (PSUP). Operation at nominal condition.

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Fig. 8

Evolution of axial temperature in the inner film at θ = 240 deg for three inner film clearances. Operation at maximum shaft speed.

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Fig. 9

Peak and average temperature of inner film versus number of grooves in ring. Operation at nominal condition and at maximum shaft speed.

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Fig. 10

Shear drag power loss versus shaft speed and versus number of axial grooves. Operation at nominal oil supply conditions.

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Fig. 11

Peak and average temperature of inner film versus groove depth in floating ring. Operation at nominal condition and maximum shaft speed.

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Fig. 12

Shear drag power loss versus groove depth in floating ring. Operation at nominal condition and two shaft speeds (maximum and 3/8).

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Fig. 13

Shear drag power loss versus shaft speed and versus axial groove width. Operation at nominal oil supply conditions.

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Fig. 14

Pressure field at bearing mid plane: test data from Ref. [18] and prediction. Shaft speed = 3200 rpm, W = 5000 N, (e, Ф) ≈ (45 μm, 50 deg). TSUP = 40 °C, PSUP = 2 bar. Tshaft = 62 °C (measured).

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Fig. 15

Temperature fields at bearing mid plane: test data from Ref. [19] and predictions. TSUP = 40 °C, PSUP = 2 bar. Tshaft = 82 °C (measured): Case 1: Shaft speed = 4.8 krpm, W = 0 N → (e,Ф) ≈ (0, 0) and Case 2: Shaft speed = 6.4 krpm, W = 5 kN → (e,Ф) ≈ (45 μm, 50 deg).

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Fig. 16

Journal center locus: test data from Ref. [19] and prediction. Shaft speed = 3.2 krpm, W = 0.1–9 kN, TSUP = 40 °C, PSUP = 2 bar. Tshaft = 62 °C for all loads.

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