0
research-article

Effects of fuel molecular weight on emissions in a jet flame and a model gas turbine combustor

[+] Author and Article Information
Anandkumar Makwana

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
axm571@psu.edu

Suresh Iyer

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
suiyer@engr.psu.edu

Milton Linevsky

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
mlinevsky@gmail.com

Robert Santoro

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
rjs2@engr.psu.edu

Thomas Litzinger

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
talme@engr.psu.edu

Jacqueline O'Connor

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
jxo22@engr.psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037928 History: Received July 11, 2017; Revised July 25, 2017

Abstract

The objective of this study is to understand the effects of fuel volatility on soot emissions. This effect is investigated in two experimental configurations: a jet flame and a model gas turbine combustor. The jet flame provides information about the effects of fuel on the spatial development of aromatics and soot in an axisymmetric, co-flow, laminar flame. The data from the model gas turbine combustor illustrate the effect of fuel volatility on net soot production under conditions similar to an actual engine at cruise. Two fuels with different boiling points are investigated: n-heptane/n-dodecane mixture and n-hexadecane/n-dodecane mixture. The jet flames are non-premixed and rich premixed flames in order to have fuel conditions similar to those in the primary zone of an aircraft engine combustor. The results from the jet flames indicate that the peak soot volume fraction produced in the n-hexadecane fuel is slightly higher as compared to the n-heptane fuel for both non-premixed and premixed flames. Comparison of aromatics and soot volume fraction in non-premixed and premixed flames shows significant differences in the spatial development of aromatics and soot along the downstream direction. The results from the model combustor indicate that, within experiment uncertainty, the net soot production is similar in both n-heptane and n-hexadecane fuel mixtures. Finally, we draw conclusions about important processes for soot formation in gas turbine combustors and what can be learned from laboratory-scale flames.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In