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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Short Helical Combustor: Flow Control in a Combustion System With Angular Air Supply

[+] Author and Article Information
Behdad Ariatabar

Institute of Thermal Turbomachinery,
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,
Karlsruhe 76131, Germany
e-mail: ariatabar@kit.edu

Rainer Koch, Hans-Jörg Bauer

Institute of Thermal Turbomachinery,
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,
Karlsruhe 76131, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 13, 2017; final manuscript received July 25, 2017; published online October 25, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(3), 031507 (Oct 25, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1355; doi: 10.1115/1.4037961 History: Received July 13, 2017; Revised July 25, 2017

The concept of the novel short helical combustor (SHC) was investigated in our previous work (Ariatabar et al., 2016, “Short Helical Combustor: Concept Study of an Innovative Gas Turbine Combustor With Angular Air Supply,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 138(3), p. 031503 and Ariatabar et al., 2017, “Short Helical Combustor: Dynamic Flow Analysis in a Combustion System With Angular Air Supply,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 139(4), p. 041505). Based on the insight gained from these previous investigations, we propose a generic design improvement to address the tremendous loss of initial angular momentum as well as inhomogeneous flow and temperature field at the outlet of the SHC. In the present paper, the main features of this design are introduced. It is shown that a three-dimensional shaping of the sidewalls, the dome, and the liners can effectively counteract the suboptimal interaction of the swirl flames with these surrounding walls. As a result, the flow at the outlet of the combustor features a high angular momentum and exhibits a uniform flow angle and temperature field. The insight gained from these generic investigations, and the resulting design optimization provides a useful framework for further industrial optimization of the SHC.

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References

Ariatabar, B. , Koch, R. , Bauer, H.-J. , and Negulescu, D.-A. , 2015, “ Short Helical Combustor: Concept Study of an Innovative Gas Turbine Combustor With Angular Air Supply,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 138(3), p. 031503. [CrossRef]
Ariatabar, B. , Koch, R. , and Bauer, H.-J. , 2016, “ Short Helical Combustor: Dynamic Flow Analysis in a Combustion System With Angular Air Supply,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 139(4), p. 041505. [CrossRef]
Schmid, H.-P. , Habisreuther, P. , and Leuckel, W. , 1998, “ A Model for Calculating Heat Release in Premixed Turbulent Flames,” Combust. Flame, 113(1–2), pp. 79–91. [CrossRef]
Yakhot, V. , Orszag, S. A. , Thangam, S. , Gatski, T. B. , and Speziale, C. G. , 1992, “ Development of Turbulence Models for Shear Flows by a Double Expansion Technique,” Phys. Fluids, 4(7), pp. 1510–1520. [CrossRef]
Bärow, E. , Koch, R. , and Bauer, H.-J. , 2013, “ Comparison of Oscillation Modes of Spray and Gaseous Flames,” Eighth Mediterranean Combustion Symposium, Izmir, Turkey, Sept. 8–13.
Gepperth, S. , Bärow, E. , Koch, R. , and Bauer, H.-J. , 2014, “ Primary Atomization of Prefilming Airblast Nozzles: Experimental Studies Using Advanced Image Processing Techniques,” 26th Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems (ILASS), Bremen, Germany, Sept. 8–10, pp. 8–10.
Pianko, M. , and Wazelt, F. , 1983, “ Propulsion and Energetics Panel Working Group 14 on Suitable Averaging Techniques in Non-Uniform Internal Flows,” Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, AGARD Advisory Report No. 182. https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwj9pMav0sfWAhUFYiYKHSB_BdAQFgglMAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sto.nato.int%2Fpublications%2FAGARD%2FAGARD-AR-182%2FAGARD-AR-182.pdf&usg=AFQjCNGD0eqBpKmEN0ONVBW6cHqqej-mBQ
Cumpsty, N. A. , and Horlock, J. H. , 2006, “ Averaging Nonuniform Flow for a Purpose,” ASME J. Turbomach., 128(1), pp. 120–129. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic illustrations of the SHC concept, the evaluation planes, and the coordinate systems (a) and the reference (REF) double-annular SHC–REF (b)

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Fig. 2

(a) Exterior of the SHC–SSW, (b) interior of the SHC–SSW, (c) isohypsen of the SHC–SSW, and (d) component of the surface normal vector in the adverse circumferential direction (−Z), normalized with its reference value for the flat sidewall surface. The mean value is the area-weighted average.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Contour plots of the relative pressure at the sidewall, dome, and inner liner. Solid iso-lines of prel = 0 localize the high-pressure zones due to the impingement of swirling jets on the sidewalls. Dotted iso-lines of prel = −0.3 and −0.6 localize the low-pressure regions. Arrows indicate the rotational direction of the swirling flows.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Successive control volumes (CV1–CV20) for the integral balance of the angular momentum in SHC. Dashed-dotted lines represent CVs; dashed lines, cyclic boundaries; and dotted lines, inlets and the combustor outlet [2].

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Fig. 5

Schematic illustration of the flow field of SHC on the evaluation plane A–A: (a) the stable high angled flow region at the midspan, (b) swirl component which augments the angled flow, (c) swirl component which weakens the angled flow, and (d) schematic illustration of the radial deflection of the swirl flames in SHC–SSW

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Time-averaged field of Ux,β on A–A planes. Black iso-lines refer to Ux,β = 0. White arrows indicate the axis of the swirling flow. The dashed arrows indicate the high Ux,β zones in flame tube in the SHC–SSW.

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Fig. 7

Development of different terms of conservation law of the angular momentum for nonreacting flow in the SHC as defined in Eq. (2). Lin,0 refers to initial angular momentum of a single annular SHC in Ref. [1]. Solid lines: Lout, dashed lines: Lp, and dash-dotted lines: Lτ.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Time-averaged field of the flow angle α at the SHC outlet (E–E plane). Black iso-lines refer to α = 30 deg. Mean values of the flow angle, α¯, are calculated using a physically consistent averaging method from Ref. [2]. Dashed lines indicate the periodic boundaries.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Time-averaged field of Ux,β on A–A planes. Black iso-lines refer to Ux,β = 0. White arrows indicate the axis of the swirling flow.

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Fig. 10

Development of different terms of conservation law of the angular momentum for reacting flow in the SHC as defined in Eq. (2). Solid lines: Lout, dashed lines: Lp, and dash-dotted lines: Lτ.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Time-averaged fields of the temperature (left) and the flow angle α (right) at the SHC outlet (E–E plane). Arrows indicate the vortex systems. Black iso-lines refer to α = 30 deg. Mean values of the flow angle, α¯, are calculated using a physically consistent averaging method from Ref. [2]. Dashed lines indicate the periodic boundaries.

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