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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Redesign of a Compressor Stage for a High-Performance Electric Supercharger in a Heavily Downsized Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Peng Wang

Advanced Design Technology,
Dilke House,
1 Malet Street,
London WC1E 7JN, UK
e-mail: p.wang@adtechnology.co.uk

Mehrdad Zangeneh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University College London,
Torrington Place,
London WC1E 7JE, UK
e-mail: m.zangeneh@ucl.ac.uk

Bryn Richards

Aeristech,
Unit G, Princes Drive Industrial Estate,
Coventry Road,
Warwickshire CV8 2FD, UK
e-mail: bryn.richards@aeristech.co.uk

Kevin Gray

Aeristech,
Unit G, Princes Drive Industrial Estate,
Coventry Road,
Warwickshire CV8 2FD, UK
e-mail: kevin.gray@aeristech.co.uk

James Tran

Aeristech,
Unit G, Princes Drive Industrial Estate,
Coventry Road,
Warwickshire CV8 2FD, UK
e-mail: james.tran@aeristech.co.uk

Asuquo Andah

Aeristech,
Unit G, Princes Drive Industrial Estate,
Coventry Road,
Warwickshire CV8 2FD, UK
e-mail: asuquo.andah@aeristech.co.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 16, 2017; final manuscript received August 15, 2017; published online November 7, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(4), 042602 (Nov 07, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1367; doi: 10.1115/1.4038021 History: Received July 16, 2017; Revised August 15, 2017

Engine downsizing is a modern solution for the reduction of CO2 emissions from internal combustion engines. This technology has been gaining increasing attention from industry. In order to enable a downsized engine to operate properly at low speed conditions, it is essential to have a compressor stage with very good surge margin. The ported shroud, also known as the casing treatment, is a conventional way used in turbochargers to widen the working range. However, the ported shroud works effectively only at pressure ratios higher than 3:1. At lower pressure ratio, its advantages for surge margin enhancements are very limited. The variable inlet guide vanes are also a solution to this problem. By adjusting the setting angles of variable inlet guide vanes, it is possible to shift the compressor map toward the smaller flow rates. However, this would also undermine the stage efficiency, require extra space for installing the inlet guide vanes, and add costs. The best solution is therefore to improve the design of impeller blade itself to attain high aerodynamic performances and wide operating ranges. This paper reports a recent study of using inverse design method for the redesign of a centrifugal compressor stage used in an electric supercharger, including the impeller blade and volute. The main requirements were to substantially increase the stable operating range of the compressor in order to meet the demands of the downsized engine. The three-dimensional (3D) inverse design method was used to optimize the impeller geometry and achieve higher efficiency and stable operating range. The predicted performance map shows great advantages when compared with the existing design. To validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results, this new compressor stage has also been prototyped and tested. It will be shown that the CFD predictions have very good agreement with experiments and the redesigned compressor stage has improved the pressure ratio, aerodynamic efficiency, choke, and surge margins considerably.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Baseline C58 impeller wheel

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Fig. 2

The baseline C58 compressor stage performance and the target for the redesign

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Fig. 3

Meridional contours of the baseline and redesigned C58 impellers

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Fig. 4

The baseline C58 compressor stage performance: pressure ratio curves and efficiency contours

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Fig. 5

The distribution of the prescribed blade loading for the redesigned impeller

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Fig. 6

Redesigned C58 impeller wheel

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Fig. 7

Computational domain for impeller only simulation

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Fig. 8

Streamlines in the impeller channel at design point: ω = 80,000 rpm, mn = 0.413: (a) C58-1 impeller channel and (b) C58-2 impeller channel

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Fig. 9

Surface streamlines on the suction surface at design point: ω = 80,000 rpm, mn = 0.413: (a) C58-1 splitter and (b) C58-2 splitter

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Fig. 10

Pressure distribution on the suction surface at design point: ω = 80,000 rpm, mn = 0.413: (a) C58-1 splitter and (b) C58-2 splitter

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Fig. 11

Mach number contour on the suction surface at 120,000 rpm, mn = 0.33: (a) C58-1 full blade and (b) C58-2 full blade

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Fig. 12

Velocity vector in the meridional plane at 120,000 rpm, mn = 0.33: (a) C58-1 full blade and (b) C58-2 full blade

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Fig. 13

Inversely designed volute

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Fig. 14

Computational domain for the compressor stage analysis at various speeds

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Fig. 15

Baseline and redesigned C58 compressor performances: comparisons of CFD predictions: (a) pressure ratio at all speedlines, (b) 40,000 rpm, (c) 60,000 rpm, (d) 80,000 rpm, (e) 100,000 rpm, and (f) 120,000 rpm

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Fig. 16

Experimental setup for measurements

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Fig. 17

Computational domain for the compressor performance validations including in- and outlet duct

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Fig. 18

Comparisons between the measured and predicted performances for the C58-2 compressor stage: (a) pressure ratio at all speedlines, (b) 40,000 rpm, (c) 60,000 rpm, (d) 80,000 rpm, (e) 100,000 rpm, and (f) 120,000 rpm

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Fig. 19

Baseline and redesigned C58 compressor performances: comparisons of measurements: (a) pressure ratio at all speedlines, (b) 40,000 rpm, (c) 60,000 rpm, (d) 80,000 rpm, (e) 100,000 rpm, and (f) 120,000 rpm

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