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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Plastic Effects on High Cycle Fatigue at the Edge of Contact of Turbine Blade Fixtures

[+] Author and Article Information
C. H. Richter

Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science,
Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences,
Albrechtstr. 30,
Osnabrück 49076, Germany
e-mail: c.h.richter@hs-osnabrueck.de

U. Krupp, M. Zeißig

Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science,
Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences,
Albrechtstr. 30,
Osnabrück 49076, Germany

G. Telljohann

DYNATEC GmbH,
Adam-Opel-Str. 4,
Braunschweig 38112, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 14, 2017; final manuscript received August 2, 2017; published online October 31, 2017. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(4), 042501 (Oct 31, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1357; doi: 10.1115/1.4038040 History: Received July 14, 2017; Revised August 02, 2017

Slender turbine blades are susceptible to excitation. Resulting vibrations stress the blade's fixture to the rotor or stator. In this paper, high cycle fatigue at the edge of contact (EOC) between blade and rotor/stator of such fixtures is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Plasticity in the contact zone and its effects on, e.g., contact tractions, fatigue determinative quantities, and fatigue itself are shown to be of considerable relevance. The accuracy of the finite element analysis (FEA) is demonstrated by comparing the predicted utilizations and slip region widths with data gained from tests. For the evaluation of EOC fatigue, tests on simple notched specimens provide the limit data. Predictions on the utilization are made for the EOC of a dovetail setup. Tests with this setup provide the experimental fatigue limit to be compared to. The comparisons carried out show a good agreement between the experimental results and the plasticity-based calculations of the demonstrated approach.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Left: fir-tree root of a turbine blade, zoom on EOC. Right: representative stress field.

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Fig. 2

Methodology employed for EOC fatigue

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Fig. 3

Dovetail specimen and pad

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Fig. 4

Joining of two EOC stresses leading to potentially uncontrollable situation during test

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Fig. 5

Load function employed in tests and FEA, amplitude is exemplary

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Fig. 6

Mesh of dovetail specimen

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Fig. 7

Convergence diagram of normalized tractions versus mesh size factor

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Fig. 8

Plastic change in load-free contact gap due to loading history from t = 0 to t = 18

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Fig. 9

Sequence of elastic normal tractions on bearing land, cf. Fig. 3, during half a load cycle

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Fig. 10

Sequence of plastic normal tractions on bearing land, cf. Fig. 3, during half a load cycle

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Fig. 11

Elastic tangential tractions during load cycle

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Fig. 12

Plastic tangential tractions during load cycle

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Fig. 13

Elastic mean stress in terms of hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress amplitude of load cycle

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Fig. 14

Plastic mean stress in terms of hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress amplitude of load cycle

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Fig. 15

Elastic and plastic limit curves (solid lines) for the Sines criterion determined from load cases A (dark dots) and B (light dots)

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Fig. 16

Elastic and plastic limit curves (short lines) for the Dang Van criterion determined from load cases A (dark V-line) and B (light V-line)

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Fig. 17

Sines evaluation of elastic FEA

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Fig. 18

Sines evaluation of plastic FEA

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Fig. 19

Dang Van evaluation of elastic FEA

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Fig. 20

Dang Van evaluation of plastic FEA

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Fig. 21

Local utilization in the EOC evaluation domain, cf. Fig.3, for elastic FEA according to Sines

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Fig. 22

Local utilization in the EOC evaluation domain, cf. Fig. 3, for plastic FEA according to Sines

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Fig. 23

Local utilization in the EOC evaluation domain, cf. Fig.3, for elastic FEA according to Dang Van

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Fig. 24

Local utilization in the EOC evaluation domain, cf. Fig.3, for plastic FEA according to Dang Van

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Fig. 25

Contact status during cycle and utilizations, Sines and Dang Van, along the evaluation path, based on elastic FEA

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Fig. 26

Contact status during cycle and utilizations, Sines and Dang Van, along the evaluation path, based on plastic FEA

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Fig. 27

Left: sliding region via FEA (thin strip), middle: photograph of bearing land of an uncracked specimen showing fretting corrosion indicating the sliding region, and right: zoom on EOC with dimensions of corrosion width

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Fig. 28

Elastic and plastic response at notch and EOC, relation to notched specimen

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