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research-article

Catalytic Influence of Water Vapor on Lean Blowoff and NOx Reduction for Pressurized Swirling Syngas Flames

[+] Author and Article Information
Daniel Pugh

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
pughdg@cardiff.ac.uk

Philip Bowen

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
bowenpj@cardiff.ac.uk

Andrew Crayford

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
crayfordap1@cardiff.ac.uk

Richard Marsh

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
marshr@cardiff.ac.uk

Jon P Runyon

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
runyonjp@cardiff.ac.uk

Steven Morris

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
morrisSM@cardiff.ac.uk

Anthony Giles

Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
GilesAP1@cardiff.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038417 History: Received July 28, 2017; Revised August 30, 2017

Abstract

Recent studies have described and evidenced the enhancement of fundamental combustion parameters such as laminar flame speed due to the catalytic influence of H2O on heavily carbonaceous syngas mixtures. Direct formation of CO2 from CO is slow due to its high activation energy, and the presence of disassociated radical hydrogen facilitates chain branching species, changing the dominant path for oxidation. The observed catalytic effect is nonmonotonic, with the reduction in flame temperature eventually prevailing, and reaction rate quenched. The potential benefits of changes in water loading are explored in terms of lean blowoff, and emissions reduction in a premixed turbulent swirling flame at conditions of elevated temperature (423K) and pressure (0.1-0.3MPa). Kinetic models are used initially to characterize the influence that H2O has on the burning characteristics of the fuel blend employed, modelling flame speed and extinction strain rate. These modeled predictions are used as a foundation to investigate the experimental flame. OH* chemiluminescence and OH PLIF are employed as optical diagnostic techniques to analyze changes in heat release structure resulting from H2O addition. A comparison is made with a CH4/air flame and changes in lean blow off stability limits are quantified. The compound benefit of CO/NOx reduction are quantified also, with production first decreasing due to the thermal effect of H2O addition from a lowering of flame temperature, coupled with the potential for further reduction from the change in lean stability limit. Power law correlations have also been derived for the change in pressure.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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