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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Aircraft Engine

Experimental Investigation on Infrared Signatures of Axisymmetric Vectoring Exhaust Nozzle With Film Cooling and Low-Emissivity Coating

[+] Author and Article Information
Jian Liu

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Nanjing University of
Aeronautics and Astronautics,
29 Yudao Street,
Nanjing 210012, Jiangsu Province, China
e-mail: lukeliu1989@163.com

Honghu Ji

College of Power and Energy Engineering,
Nanjing University of
Aeronautics and Astronautics,
29 Yudao Street,
Nanjing 210012, Jiangsu Province, China
e-mail: jhhpe@nuaa.edu.cn

Contributed by the Aircraft Engine Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 31, 2017; final manuscript received November 14, 2017; published online June 15, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Riccardo Da Soghe.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(9), 091203 (Jun 15, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1415; doi: 10.1115/1.4038813 History: Received July 31, 2017; Revised November 14, 2017

Investigations on infrared (IR) radiation suppression of axisymmetric vectoring exhaust nozzle (AVEN) are meaningful, due to the requests for maneuverability and IR stealth capability of aircrafts. In this paper, the synthetic suppression scheme of film cooling and low-emissivity coating was adopted on the center body and divergent flaps of the nozzles at 0 deg, 10 deg, and 20 deg vectoring angles. The IR signatures of both the baseline AVEN and the nozzles with IR suppression were measured. Comparing the IR signatures of the nozzles with and without IR suppression measures, the IR suppression effectiveness of the film cooling and low-emissivity coating was obtained. The investigation results indicate that the IR signatures of AVEN decrease with the increase of vectoring angle. The film cooling enables a remarkable decrease of the IR signatures of AVEN. The synthetic suppression of film cooling and low-emissivity coating enables a further decrease of IR signatures. For the case studied in this paper, the integrated radiation intensities of the nozzles with film cooling and low-emissivity coating at 0 deg, 10 deg, and 20 deg vectoring angles are decreased by 52.3%, 57.9%, and 37.2% at 0 deg measurement angle, respectively.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Structure of the AVEN at various vectoring angles

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Fig. 2

Calculation angles for the numerical prediction of AVEN's IR signatures

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Fig. 3

Spatial distributions of the main components' radiation contributions: (a) δ = 0 deg and (b) δ = 20 deg, vertical plane

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Fig. 4

Locations of the thermocouples installed on the center body and divergent flaps

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Fig. 5

Film holes cooling structure of center body

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Fig. 6

Schematic diagram of the film holes of the center body

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Fig. 7

Center body with film cooling and infrared low-emissivity coating: (a) center body with film holes (detail) and (b) center body installation

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Fig. 8

Film holes cooling structure of divergent flaps

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Fig. 9

Divergent flaps with film cooling and IR low-emissivity coating: (a) divergent flap with film holes (detail) and (b) divergent flaps installation (δ = 10 deg)

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Fig. 10

Nozzle's IR signatures simulation apparatus: (a) schematic of the experimental rig with the exhaust system model and (b) photograph of the experimental rig

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Fig. 11

Illustration of measurement angles of nozzle's IR signatures

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Fig. 12

Temperatures measured by the thermocouples on the center body of the baseline nozzles and the nozzles with film cooling: (a) δ = 0 deg, (b) δ = 10 deg, and (c) δ = 20 deg

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Fig. 13

Temperatures measured by the thermocouples on the divergent flaps of the baseline nozzles and the nozzles with film cooling: (a) δ = 0 deg, (b) δ = 10 deg, and (c) δ = 20 deg

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Fig. 14

Spectral radiation intensities of the baseline nozzle without IR suppression at δ = 0 deg vectoring angle at α = 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg measurement angles

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Fig. 15

Integrated radiation intensities of the baseline nozzles at three different vectoring angles: (a) horizontal plane and (b) vertical plane

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Fig. 16

Integrated radiation intensities of the baseline nozzle and the nozzle with IR suppression at δ = 0 deg

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Fig. 17

Integrated radiation intensities of the baseline nozzle and the nozzle with IR suppression at δ = 10 deg: (a) horizontal plane and (b) vertical plane

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Fig. 18

Integrated radiation intensities of the baseline nozzle and the nozzle with IR suppression at δ = 20 deg: (a) horizontal plane and (b) vertical plane

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Fig. 19

The spectral radiation intensities of the nonvectoring nozzle at α = 0 deg measurement angle in three repeated measurements

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