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research-article

An Investigation of the Combustion Process of a Heavy-Duty Natural Gas-Diesel Dual Fuel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Hailin Li

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
hailin.li@mail.wvu.edu

Shiyu Liu

West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
shiyu.liu2008@yahoo.com

Chetmun Liu

West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
chetmun.liew@cummins.com

Timothy Gatts

West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
timothygatts@gmail.com

Scott Wayne

West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
scott.wayne@mail.wvu.edu

Nigel N. Clark

West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506
nigel.clark@mail.wvu.edu

John Nuszkowski

University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL, 32224
john.nuszkowski@unf.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039812 History: Received July 03, 2017; Revised March 08, 2018

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of the addition of natural gas (NG) and engine load on the brake thermal efficiency, peak cylinder pressure PCP), combustion process, and combustion efficiency of methane of a heavy-duty NG-diesel dual fuel engine. The significantly increased PCP was only observed with the addition of NG at 100% load. The addition of a relatively large amount NG at high load slightly retarded the premixed combustion, significantly increased the peak heat release rate (PHRR) of the diffusion combustion, and advanced combustion phasing defined as CA50. The changes in combustion process at high load were supported by the increased NOx emissions with the addition of over 3% NG (vol.). By comparison, when operated at low load, the addition of a large amount of NG decreased the PHRR of the premixed combustion and slightly increased the PHRR during the late diffusion combustion. Improved brake thermal efficiency was only observed with the addition of a relatively large amount of NG at high load. The improved thermal efficiency was due to a decrease in combustion duration and the shifting of the combustion phasing toward the optimal phasing. The overall combustion efficiency of the dual fuel operation was always lower than diesel only operation due to the emissions of the unburned methane and carbon monoxide, which deteriorated the potential of dual fuel engine operation in further improving the brake thermal efficiency.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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