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research-article

Spray-wall interactions in a small-bore, multi-cylinder engine operating with reactivity-controlled compression ignition

[+] Author and Article Information
Martin Wissink

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA
wissinkml@ornl.gov

Scott Curran

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA
curransj@ornl.gov

Chaitanya Kavuri

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
nkavuri@wisc.edu

Sage Kokjohn

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
kokjohn@wisc.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039817 History: Received February 28, 2018; Revised March 12, 2018

Abstract

Experimental work on reactivity-controlled compression ignition (RCCI) in a small-bore, multi-cylinder engine operating on premixed iso-octane and direct-injected n-heptane has shown an unexpected combustion phasing advance at early injection timings, which has not been observed in large-bore engines operating under RCCI at similar conditions. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to investigate whether spray-wall interactions could be responsible for this result. Comparison of the spray penetration, fuel film mass, and in-cylinder visualization of the spray from the CFD results to the experimentally measured combustion phasing and emissions provided compelling evidence of strong fuel impingement at injection timings earlier than -90 crank angle degrees (°CA) after top dead center (aTDC), and transition from partial to full impingement between -65 and -90°CA aTDC. Based on this evidence, explanations for the combustion phasing advance at early injection timings are proposed along with potential verification experiments.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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