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research-article

Effects of Purge Flow Configuration on Sealing Effectiveness in a Rotor-Stator Cavity

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenneth Clark

Pratt & Whitney, East Hartford, CT, USA
kenneth.clark@pw.utc.com

Michael Barringer

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
mbarringer@psu.edu

Dave Johnson

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
dkj103@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
kthole@psu.edu

Eric Grover

Pratt & Whitney, East Hartford, CT, USA
eric.grover@pw.utc.com

Christopher Robak

Pratt & Whitney, East Hartford, CT, USA
christopher.robak@pw.utc.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040308 History: Received April 15, 2018; Revised May 13, 2018

Abstract

Secondary air is bled from the compressor in a gas turbine engine to cool turbine components and seal the cavities between stages. Unsealed cavities can lead to hot gas ingestion, which can degrade critical components or, in extreme cases, can be catastrophic to engines. For this study, a 1.5 stage turbine with an engine-realistic rim seal was operated at an engine-relevant axial Reynolds number, rotational Reynolds number, and Mach number. Purge flow was introduced into the inter-stage cavity through distinct purge holes for two different configurations. This paper compares the two configurations over a range of purge flow rates. Sealing effectiveness measurements, deduced from the use of CO2 as a flow tracer, indicated that the sealing characteristics were improved by increasing the number of uniformly distributed purge holes and improved by increasing levels of purge flow. For the larger number of purge holes, a fully sealed cavity was possible while for the smaller number of purge holes, a fully sealed cavity was not possible. For this representative cavity model, sealing effectiveness measurements were compared with a well-accepted orifice model derived from simplified cavity models. Sealing effectiveness levels at some locations within the cavity were well-predicted by the orifice model, but due to the complexity of the realistic rim seal and the purge flow delivery, the effectiveness levels at other locations were not well-predicted.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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