0
research-article

FORCED RESPONSE REDUCTION OF A BLISK BY MEANS OF INTENTIONAL MISTUNING

[+] Author and Article Information
Bernd Beirow

Brandenburg University of Technology, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus, Germany
beirow@b-tu.de

Arnold Kühhorn

Brandenburg University of Technology, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus, Germany
kuehhorn@b-tu.de

Felix Figaschewsky

Brandenburg University of Technology, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus, Germany
felix.figascheswky@b-tu.de

Alfons Bornhorn

MAN Diesel & Turbo SE, Stadtbachstr. 1, D-86153 Augsburg, Germany
alfons.bornhorn@man.eu

Oleg V. Repetckii

Irkutsk State Agrarian University, Irkutsk, Russia
repetckii@igsha.ru

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040715 History: Received June 22, 2018; Revised June 26, 2018

Abstract

The effect of intentional mistuning has been analyzed for an axial turbocharger blisk with the objective of limiting the forced response due to low engine order excitation (LEO). The idea behind the approach was to increase the aerodynamic damping for the most critical fundamental mode in a way that a safe operation is ensured without severely losing aerodynamic performance. Apart from alternate mistuning a more effective mistuning pattern is investigated, which has been derived by means of optimization employing genetic algorithms. In order to keep the manufacturing effort as small as possible only two blade different geometries have been allowed which means that an integer optimization problem has been formulated. Two blisk prototypes have been manufactured for the purpose of demonstrating the benefit of the intentional mistuning pattern identified in this way: A first one with and a second one without employing intentional mistuning. The real mistuning of the prototypes has been experimentally identified. It is shown that the benefit regarding the forced response reduction is retained in spite of the negative impact of unavoidable additional mistuning due to the manufacturing process. Independently, further analyzes have been focused on the robustness of the solution by considering increasing random structural mistuning and aerodynamic mistuning as well. The latter one has been modeled by means of varying aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC) as part of Monte Carlo simulations. Reduced order models have been employed for these purposes.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In