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research-article

Design of Acoustic Liner in Small Gas Turbine Combustor Using One-Dimensional Impedance Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Daesik Kim

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Gangneung-Wonju National University, 150 Namwon-ro, Wonju, Gangwon 26403, Republic of Korea
dkim@gwnu.ac.kr

Seungchai Jung

Gas Turbine Development Team, Hanwha Aerospace R&D Center, 471 Pangyo, Bundang, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 13521, Republic of Korea
schai.jung@hanwha.com

Heeho Park

Gas Turbine Development Team, Hanwha Aerospace R&D Center, 471 Pangyo, Bundang, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 13521, Republic of Korea
hh810.park@hanwha.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040765 History: Received February 23, 2018; Revised June 27, 2018

Abstract

The side-wall cooling liner in a gas turbine combustor serves main purposes-heat transfer and emission control. Additionally, it functions as a passive damper to attenuate thermoacoustic instabilities. The perforations in the liner mainly convert acoustic energy into kinetic energy through vortex shedding at the orifice rims. In previous decades, several analytical and semi-empirical models have been proposed to predict the acoustic damping of the perforated liner. In the current study, a few of the models are considered to embody the transfer matrix method for analyzing the acoustic dissipation in a concentric tube resonator with a perforated element and validated against experimental data in literature. All models are shown to quantitatively-appropriately predict the acoustic behavior under high bias flow velocity conditions. Then, the models are applied to maximize the damping performance in a realistic gas turbine combustor, which is under development. It is found that the ratio of the bias flow Mach number to the porosity can be used as a design guideline in choosing the optimal combination of the number and diameter of perforations in terms of acoustic damping.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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