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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Design of Acoustic Liner in Small Gas Turbine Combustor Using One-Dimensional Impedance Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Daesik Kim

School of Mechanical and
Automotive Engineering,
Gangneung-Wonju National University,
150 Namwon-ro, Wonju 26403,
Gangwon, South Korea
e-mail: dkim@gwnu.ac.kr

Seungchai Jung, Heeho Park

Gas Turbine Development Team,
Hanwha Aerospace R&D Center,
471 Pangyo, Bundang, Seongnam 13521,
Gyeonggi, South Korea

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 23, 2018; final manuscript received June 27, 2018; published online August 20, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Riccardo Da Soghe.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(12), 121505 (Aug 20, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-18-1090; doi: 10.1115/1.4040765 History: Received February 23, 2018; Revised June 27, 2018

The side-wall cooling liner in a gas turbine combustor serves main purposes—heat transfer and emission control. Additionally, it functions as a passive damper to attenuate thermoacoustic instabilities. The perforations in the liner mainly convert acoustic energy into kinetic energy through vortex shedding at the orifice rims. In the previous decades, several analytical and semi-empirical models have been proposed to predict the acoustic damping of the perforated liner. In the current study, a few of the models are considered to embody the transfer matrix method (TMM) for analyzing the acoustic dissipation in a concentric tube resonator with a perforated element and validated against experimental data in the literature. All models are shown to quantitatively appropriately predict the acoustic behavior under high bias flow velocity conditions. Then, the models are applied to maximize the damping performance in a realistic gas turbine combustor, which is under development. It is found that the ratio of the bias flow Mach number to the porosity can be used as a design guideline in choosing the optimal combination of the number and diameter of perforations in terms of acoustic damping.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Definition of key parameters in an acoustic perforated liner

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Model validation results for bias flow Mach number effect (Mg = 0). Models of Jing, Betts, Bauer, and Elnady are from Eqs. (4), (5), (6), and (7)(9), respectively, and measurement data are from Ref. [10]. (a) Liner A (low porosity) and (b) liner B (high porosity).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Typical example of acoustic damping measurement setup for a perforated plate with normal incidence wave [26]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Typical example of an acoustic damping measurement setup for a perforated plate with normal incidence wave (modified from Refs. [21,37]): (a) common two-duct perforated section and (b) concentric tube resonator

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Benchmark duct acoustic test rig and selected perforated liner geometry [10,11]: (a) duct acoustic test rig, (b) liner A (low perforation), and (c) liner B (high perforation)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Model validation results for simultaneous bias and grazing flow conditions. Models of Bauer and Elnady are from Eqs. (6) and (7)(9), respectively, and measurement data are from Ref. [10]: (a) Mb = 0.016 and (b) Mb = 0.035.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Practical gas turbine combustor under consideration: (a) sectional view and (b) schematic diagram

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Dissipation coefficient calculation results as a function of frequency according to impedance models (Mg = 0.06, σ = 0.02, and SPL = 100 dB). Models of Jing, Betts, Bauer, and Elnady are from Eqs. (4), (5), (6), and (7)(9), respectively: (a) Mb = 0.1 and (b) Mb = 0.18.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Normalized impedance calculation results as a function of frequency according to impedance models (Mb = 0.18, Mg = 0.06, σ=0.02, and SPL = 100 dB). Models of Jing, Betts, Bauer, and Elnady are from Eqs. (4), (5), (6), and (7)(9), respectively: (a) normalized resistance and (b) normalized reactance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Dissipation coefficient calculation results as a function of frequency using Jing's model in Eq. (4) (Mg = 0.06 and SPL = 100 dB): (a) effect of bias flow Mach number (σ = 0.02) and (b) effect of porosity (Mb = 0.16)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Dissipation coefficient calculation results as a function of the ratio of bias flow Mach number to porosity using Jing's model in Eq. (4) (Mb = 0.03–0.21, σ = 0.02, 0.05, 0.07, Mg = 0.06, and SPL = 100 dB)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Dissipation integral calculation results as a function of bias flow Mach number using Jing's model in Eq. (4) (Mg = 0.06 and SPL = 100 dB): (a) σ=0.025 and (b) σ = 0.08

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Dissipation integral calculation results as a function of the ratio of bias flow Mach number to porosity using Jing's model in Eq. (4) (Mg = 0.06 and SPL = 100 dB): (a) DI (50–1000 Hz) and (b) DI (50–2000 Hz)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Suggested number of holes at a given hole diameter using Eq. (29)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Normalized dissipation as a function of SPL (Mg = 0.06 and σ = 0.02). The dissipation is normalized by the value at the SPL of 80 dB for each condition. Models of Betts and Elnady are from Eqs. (5) and (7)(9), respectively. (a) Mb = 0.03 and (b) Mb = 0.1.

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