0
research-article

UNSTEADY CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER INVESTIGATION OF A MULTISTAGE STEAM TURBINE IN WARM-KEEPING OPERATION WITH HOT AIR

[+] Author and Article Information
Piotr Luczynski

Institute for Power Plant Technology, Steam and Gas Turbines, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52062 Aachen, Germany
luczynski@ikdg.rwth-aachen.de

Dennis Toebben

Institute for Power Plant Technology, Steam and Gas Turbines, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52062 Aachen, Germany
toebben@ikdg.rwth-aachen.de

Manfred Wirsum

Institute for Power Plant Technology, Steam and Gas Turbines, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52062 Aachen, Germany
wirsum@ikdg.rwth-aachen.de

Wolfgang F. D. Mohr

GE Power AG, Brown Boveri Str. 7, 5401 Baden, Switzerland
wolfgang.mohr@ge.com

Klaus Helbig

GE Power AG, Boveristraße 22, 68309 Mannheim, Germany
klaus.helbig@ge.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040823 History: Received June 22, 2018; Revised July 03, 2018

Abstract

In pursuit of flexibility improvements, General Electric has developed a product to warm-keep high/intermediate pressure steam turbines using hot air. In order to optimize the warm-keeping operation and to gain knowledge about the dominant heat transfer phenomena and flow structures, detailed numerical investigations are required. For the sake of the investigation of the warm-keeping process as found in the presented research, single and multistage numerical turbine models were developed. Furthermore, an innovative calculation approach called the Equalized Timescales Method (ET) was applied for the modeling of unsteady conjugate heat transfer (CHT). In the course of the research, the setup of the ET approach has been additionally investigated. Using the ET method, the mass flow rate and the rotational speed were varied to generate a database of warm-keeping operating points. The main goal of this work is to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the flow field and heat transfer in a wide range of turbine warm-keeping operations and to characterize the flow patterns observed at these operating points. For varying values of flow coefficient and angle of incidence, the secondary flow phenomena change from well-known vortex systems occurring in design operation to effects typical for windage, like patterns of alternating vortices and strong backflows. Furthermore, the identified flow patterns have been compared to vortex systems described in cited literature and summarized in the so-called blade vortex diagram. The anylysis of heat transfer in turbine warm-keeping operation is additionally provided.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In