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research-article

Dual Drive Booster for a Two-Spool Turbofan: High Shaft Power Offtake Capability for MEA and Hybrid Aircraft Concepts

[+] Author and Article Information
Vadim Kloos

Institute of Jet Propulsion and Turbomachinery, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52062 Aachen, Germany
kloos@ist.rwth-aachen.de

Trevor H Speak

Derwent Aviation Consulting Ltd, 58-60 Wetmore Road, Burton on Trent, DE14 1SN, UK
trevor.speak@hotmail.com

Robert J Sellick

Derwent Aviation Consulting Ltd, 58-60 Wetmore Road, Burton on Trent, DE14 1SN, UK
robertsellick@msn.com

Prof.dr. Peter Jeschke

Institute of Jet Propulsion and Turbomachinery, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52062 Aachen, Germany
jeschke@ist.rwth-aachen.de

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040822 History: Received June 24, 2018; Revised July 01, 2018

Abstract

The more electric aircraft (MEA) concept promises to offer advantages with respect to aircraft performance, maintenance and operating costs. The engines for the MEA concept are based on conventional turbofan architectures. The significantly increased shaft power offtake that is required by the airframe can impair the performance of the engine. In this work, a novel turbofan architecture is investigated for its potential to avoid the problems related to high shaft power offtakes. This architecture is called the dual drive booster because it uses a summation gearbox to drive the booster from both the low- and high-pressure spool. The shaft power, if taken off the booster spool, is effectively provided by both the low- and high-pressure spools. This new concept is benchmarked against a two-spool direct drive and a geared drive turbofan. The presented concept mitigates some of the problems which are encountered during high power offtake in conventional configurations. In particular, the core compressors are less affected by a change in shaft power offtake. This allows higher power offtakes and gives more flexibility during engine design and operation. Additionally, the potential to use the new configuration as a gas turbine-electric hybrid engine is assessed, where electrical power boost is applied during critical flight phases. The ability to convert additional shaft power is compared with conventional configurations. Here, the new configuration also shows superior behavior because the core compressors are significantly less affected by power input than in conventional configurations.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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