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research-article

THERMAL BOUNDARY LAYER RESPONSE TO PERIODIC FLUCTUATIONS FOR TURBULENT FLOW

[+] Author and Article Information
Jorge Saavedra

Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, 47907 IN, USA; von Karman Institute for Fluid Mechanics, Rhode-Saint-Genèse, B-1640, Belgium
jorsaaga@gmail.com

Guillermo Paniagua

Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, 47907 IN, USA; von Karman Institute for Fluid Mechanics, Rhode-Saint-Genèse, B-1640, Belgium
gpaniagua@me.com

Olivier Chazot

Chaussée de Waterloo, 72 Rhode-St-Genèse, 1640 Belgium
chazot@vki.ac.be

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041138 History: Received July 09, 2018; Revised July 18, 2018

Abstract

The detailed characterization of the thermal boundary lay-er under periodic fluctuations is vital to improve the perfor-mance of cooled turbine airfoils, as well as to assess noise thermal and structural fatigue. In the present contribution, we performed detailed Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations to investigate wall heat flux response to periodic flow velocity fluctuations over a flat plate. We also investigated the boundary layer response to sudden flow acceleration including periodic flow perturbations, caused by inlet total pressure variations. During a flow acceleration phase, the boundary layer is first stretched, resulting in an increase of the wall shear stress. Later on, due to the viscous diffusion, the low momentum flow adjusts to the new free stream conditions. The behavior of the boundary layer at low frequency is similar to the response to an individual deceleration followed by one acceleration. However, at higher frequencies the mean flow topology is completely altered. One would expect that higher acceleration rates would cause a further stretching of the boundary layer that should cause even greater wall shear stresses and heat fluxes. However, we observed the opposite; the amplitude of the skin friction coefficient is abated, while the peak level is a full order of magnitude smaller than at low frequency.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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