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Research Papers

Importance of Surface Curvature in Modeling Droplet Impingement on Fan Blades

[+] Author and Article Information
Charles B. Burson-Thomas

National Centre for Advanced Tribology (nCATS),
University of Southampton,
Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
e-mail: c.bursonthomas@soton.ac.uk

Richard Wellman

Surface Engineering,
Rolls-Royce plc.,
Derby DE24 8BJ, UK

Terry J. Harvey, Robert J. K. Wood

National Centre for Advanced Tribology (nCATS),
University of Southampton,
Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 29, 2018; final manuscript received July 23, 2018; published online October 4, 2018. Editor: Jerzy T. Sawicki.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 141(3), 031005 (Oct 04, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-18-1402; doi: 10.1115/1.4041149 History: Received June 29, 2018; Revised July 23, 2018

When modeling a droplet impingement, it is reasonable to assume a surface is flat when the radius of curvature of the surface is significantly larger than the droplet radius. In other contexts where water droplet erosion (WDE) has been investigated, the typical droplet size has either been sufficiently small, or the radius of curvature of the surface sufficiently large, that it has been sensible to make this assumption. The equations describing the kinematics of an impinging water droplet on a flat surface were reformulated for a curved surface. The results suggest the relatively similar radii of curvature, of the leading-edge of a fan blade and the impinging water droplet, will significantly affect the application of the initial high-pressures, along with the onset of lateral outflow jetting. Jetting is predicted to commence substantially sooner and not in unison along the contact periphery, leading to an asymmetric flow stage. This is likely to have significant implications for the WDE that occurs, and thus, the engineering approaches to minimize the WDE of fan blades.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Topics: Drops , Modeling , Blades , Waves
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Two stages of droplet impingement (adapted from Ref. [6]): (a) initial compressible stage, shaded region is compressed liquid and (b) secondary flow stage, can commence once shock front overtakes contact periphery

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Fig. 2

Comparison of variation in ratio between radius of curvature of the surface (R) and droplet radius (r)

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Fig. 3

Geometry of spherical liquid droplet impinging on flat surface

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Fig. 4

Droplet size distribution in different intensities of natural rain [33]

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Fig. 5

Idealized 3D geometry for droplet impingement on fan blades

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Fig. 6

Two-dimensional reduction in plane where curvature is most pronounced

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Fig. 7

Geometry of droplet impingement on curved surface when Xe = Xc

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Fig. 8

Path of release wave on curved surface

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Fig. 9

Effect of variation in radius of curvature (R) on expansion and contraction of contact area

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Fig. 10

Effect of variation in impact velocity (V) on expansion and contraction of contact area

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Fig. 11

Effect of variation in droplet radius (r) on expansion and contraction of contact area

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Fig. 12

Effect of variation in radius of curvature (R) on duration of compressible stage (tr), compared with flat assumption

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Fig. 13

Effect of variation in radius of curvature (R) on normalized duration of compressible stage (tr¯), for different impact velocities (V)

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Fig. 14

Effect of variation in ratio of radii of curvature, R/r, on normalized duration of compressible stage (tr¯), for different droplet radii (r)

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