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Research Papers

Life-Limiting Behavior of an Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature Subject to Foreign Object Damage

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael J. Presby

Naval Air Systems Command,
Patuxent River, MD 20670
e-mail: mjp80@zips.uakron.edu

Nesredin Kedir, Luis J. Sanchez, D. Calvin Faucett, Sung R. Choi

Naval Air Systems Command,
Patuxent River, MD 20670

Gregory N. Morscher

The University of Akron,
Akron, OH 44325

1Present address: Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325.

2Corresponding author.

3Present address: Department of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Manuscript received July 13, 2018; final manuscript received July 23, 2018; published online October 4, 2018. Editor: Jerzy T. Sawicki.This work is in part a work of the U.S. Government. ASME disclaims all interest in the U.S. Government's contributions.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 141(3), 031012 (Oct 04, 2018) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-18-1492; doi: 10.1115/1.4041145 History: Received July 13, 2018; Revised July 23, 2018

The life-limiting behavior of an N720/alumina oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composite (CMC) was assessed in tension in air at 1200 °C for unimpacted and impacted specimens. CMC targets were subjected to ballistic impact at ambient temperature with an impact velocity of 250 m/s under a full support configuration. Subsequent postimpact ultimate tensile strength was determined as a function of test rate in order to determine the susceptibility to delayed failure or slow crack growth (SCG). Unimpacted and impacted specimens exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate tensile strength on test rate such that the ultimate tensile strength decreased with decreasing test rate. Damage was characterized using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A phenomenological life prediction model was developed in order to predict life from one loading condition (constant stress-rate loading) to another (constant stress loading). The model was verified in part via a theoretical preloading analysis.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Typical microstructure of N720/alumina oxide/oxide CMC used in this study [12]

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Fig. 2

FOD target supports; a full support configuration was implemented in the work

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Fig. 3

A typical representation of the impact damage generated in N720/alumina CMC targets by 1.59 mm hardened chrome steel ball projectiles in full support configuration at 250m/s: (a) SEM image of frontal impact damage and (b) cross-sectional view obtained by X-ray CT

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Fig. 4

A chrome steel ball projectile retrieved after impact at 250 m/s in full support: (a) overall and (b) an area (circled in left figure) showing broken fibers and matrix material adhered to the surface of the projectile

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Fig. 5

Results of ultimate tensile strength as a function of applied stress rate for unimpacted and impacted specimens at elevated temperature (1200 °C) in air. The solid lines represent the best-fit regression lines based on Eq. (2). The SCG parameter n was included along with the as-received (As-R) ultimate tensile strength at ambient temperature (23 °C).

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Fig. 6

Fracture surfaces obtained through constant stress-rate testing for unimpacted and impacted specimens for highest (0.95 MPa/s) and lowest (0.0095 MPa/s) applied stress rates. The first image in row corresponds to a side view of the fracture surface and the subsequent images in row display a zoomed-in view of fracture surface to highlight the extent of fiber pullout.

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Fig. 7

Results of preload tests for unimpacted and impacted specimens. A theoretical prediction based on Eq. (3) is included.

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Fig. 8

Life prediction for unimpacted and impacted specimens under constant stress (stress rupture) testing in log-log scales. The life prediction was made based on Eq. (5) from the results of constant stress-rate testing.

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Fig. 9

Results of constant stress (stress rupture) testing for N720/alumina. The solid lines represent the best fit of the experimental data and the dashed lines represent the predictions made based on Eq. (5). Unimpacted stress rupture data at 1200 °C in air were taken from Ruggles-Wrenn et al. [27] and COI Ceramics.4

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Fig. 10

Experimental results from constant stress (static fatigue) along with prediction from constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing of FOD samples

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