0
research-article

PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF WIRE BASED LASER METAL DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM

[+] Author and Article Information
Martin Schulz

Fraunhofer IPT Aachen, Germany
martin.schulz@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Fritz Klocke

Fraunhofer IPT Aachen, Germany
fritz.klocke@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Jan Riepe

Fraunhofer IPT Aachen, Germany
jan.riepe@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Nils Klingbeil

Fraunhofer IPT Aachen, Germany
ak-nk@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Kristian Arntz

Fraunhofer IPT Aachen, Germany
kristian.arntz@ipt.fraunhofer.de

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041167 History: Received June 28, 2018; Revised July 25, 2018

Abstract

Titanium alloys are used instead of steel and nickel-based alloys to lower the weight of turbines whenever it is applicable. Due to the high manufacturing costs of titanium, near-net-shape processes like laser metal deposition (LMD) processes are an approach to improve the production of new turbomachinery components. Additionally, these processes are also suitable for repair. LMD uses wire or powder as additional material. When highly reactive materials like titanium grade 5 (Ti6Al4V) are processed, wire-based laser metal deposition (LMD-W) processes are superior to powder-based processes due to the smaller reactive surface. Nowadays, three main challenges exist when titanium grade 5 (Ti6Al4V) is processed by additive manufacturing (AM): First of all the high affinity to oxygen combined with the increased brittleness of the material in case of a contamination with already low amounts of oxygen has to be faced. Secondly, the material is prone to distortion induced by thermal stress during the manufacturing process. Finally, the material has a complex bimodal microstructure, which has to be adjusted properly to generate optimal strength. The following publication will present how these technical challenges are faced. The heat input into the workpiece and thereby the area that has to be covered with shielding gas is minimized. This is done by minimizing the laser spot size as well as adjusting the travel speed. Thereby a local shielding of the process was realized. With this optimized process, it was possible to generate several specimens for metallurgical analysis.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In