0
research-article

Gas Turbine Fouling: A comparison Among One Hundred Heavy-Duty Frames

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicola Aldi

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
nicola.aldi@unife.it

Nicola Casari

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
nicola.casari@unife.it

Mirko Morini

Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università degli Studi di Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy
mirko.morini@unipr.it

Michele Pinelli

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
michele.pinelli@unife.it

Pier Ruggero Spina

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
pier.ruggero.spina@unife.it

Alessio Suman

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
alessio.suman@unife.it

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041249 History: Received July 27, 2018; Revised July 31, 2018

Abstract

Over recent decades, the variability and high costs of the traditional gas turbine fuels (e.g. natural gas), have pushed operators to consider low-grade fuels for running heavy-duty frames. Synfuels, obtained from coal, petroleum or biomass gasification, could represent valid alternatives in this sense. Synfuels are filtered before the combustor stage, but the contaminants are not removed completely. This fact leads to a considerable amount of deposition on the nozzle vanes due to the high temperature value. Particle deposition can increase surface roughness, modify the airfoil shape and clog the coolant passages. At the same time, land based power units experience compressor fouling. Hot sections and compressor fouling work together to determine performance degradation. This paper proposes an analysis of the contaminant deposition on hot gas turbine sections based on machine nameplate data. The combination of gas turbine net power, efficiency and turbine inlet temperature with different types of synfuel contaminants highlights how each gas turbine is subjected to particle deposition. The simulation of particle deposition on one hundred gas turbines ranging from 1.2 MW to 420 MW was conducted following the fouling susceptibility criterion. Low-efficiency frames (characterized by lower values of TIT) show the best compromise in order to reduce the effects of particle deposition in the presence of high-temperature melting contaminants. A high-efficiency frame is suitable when the contaminants are characterized by a low-melting point thanks to their lower fuel consumption.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In