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research-article

EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATED CMC TURBINE AIRFOIL EROSION

[+] Author and Article Information
Yoji Okita

Corporate Research & Development, IHI Corporation, Yokohama, Japan
youji_ookita@ihi.co.jp

Yousuke Mizokami

Aero-Engine & Space Operations, IHI Corporation, Tokyo, Japan
yousuke_mizokami@ihi.co.jp

Jun Hasegawa

Aero-Engine & Space Operations, IHI Corporation, Tokyo, Japan
jun_hasegawa@ihi.co.jp

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041385 History: Received July 17, 2018; Revised August 17, 2018

Abstract

Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) have higher temperature durability and lower density compared to super-alloys. One of promising CMC systems, SiC-SiC is able to sustain its mechanical property at higher temperature, though it inherently needs environmental barrier coating (EBC) to avoid oxidation. There are several requirements for EBC. One of such critical requirements is its resistance to particle erosion, whereas this subject hasn't been well investigated in the past. The present work presents the results of a combined experimental and numerical research to evaluate the erosion characteristics of CMC+EBC material. First, experiments were carried out in an erosion test facility using 50 micron diameter silica as erosion media under typical engine conditions with velocity of 225 m/s, temperature of 1311 K, and impingement angles of 30, 60, and 80deg. The data displayed brittle erosion mode in that the erosion rate increased with impact angles. Also, it was verified that Neilson-Gilchrist erosion model can reproduce the erosion behavior fairly well if the model was properly tuned. The numerical multi-phase simulation with the calibrated erosion model was then applied to compute flow field, particle trajectories, and erosion profile around a generic turbine airfoil to assess the erosion characteristics of the proposed CMC+EBC material when applied to airfoil. The trajectories indicated that the particles primarily impacted the airfoil leading edge and the pressure surface. Surface erosion patterns were predicted based on the calculated trajectories and the experimentally-based erosion characteristics.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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