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research-article

Stability prediction of the nuclear turbine blades during wet steam non-equilibrium condensation process

[+] Author and Article Information
Bing Guo

School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, P.R. China; Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture, Ministry of Education, Jinan, P.R. China; National Demonstration Center for Experimental Mechanical Engineering, Education, Jinan, P.R. China
guobingsdu@163.com

Weixiao Tang

School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, P.R. China; Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture, Ministry of Education, Jinan, P.R. China; National Demonstration Center for Experimental Mechanical Engineering, Education, Jinan, P.R. China
tangwx@sdu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043718 History: Received May 01, 2018; Revised May 04, 2019

Abstract

Stability of the nuclear turbine blades is difficult to be accurately predicted because the wet steam load (WSL)) as well as its induced equivalent damping and stiffness during non-equilibrium condensation process (NECP) are hard to be directly calculated. Generally, in design, NECP is assumed as equilibrium condensation process (ECP), of which the two-phase temperature difference (PTD) between gaseous and liquid is ignored. In this paper, a novel method to calculate the WSL-induced equivalent damping and equivalent stiffness during NECP based on the combined micro-perturbation method and computational fluid dynamics method was proposed. Once the WSL-induced equivalent damping and equivalent stiffness are determined, the stability of the blade-WSL system, of which the blade was modeled by a pretwisted airfoil cantilever beam, can then be predicted based on the Lyapunov first method. Besides, to estimate the effects of PTD, comparisons between the WSL-induced equivalent damping and equivalent stiffness as well as the unstable area during NECP and ECP were presented. Results show that the WSL-induced equivalent damping and equivalent stiffness during NECP are more sensitive to the inlet boundary due to the irreversible heat transfer caused by PTD during NECP. Accordingly, the unstable area during NECP is about three times larger than during ECP.

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