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RESEARCH PAPERS

J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):1-12. doi:10.1115/1.3616597.

This paper describes the special facilities and instrumentation developed and used in the study of aircraft turbine-engine noise at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. Studies of jet-exhaust noise and compressor-blade noise have required extensive use of the experimental method to obtain basic understanding and to provide design data. Both model-scale and full-scale facilities are described, as well as instrumentation systems for recording and analyzing the acoustic data.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):14-21. doi:10.1115/1.3616574.

The effects of compositional variations and the influence of production methods and heat-treatment on the properties of titanium and aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloys are described to illustrate metallurgical considerations involved in development of nickel-base high-temperature sheet alloys. Particular attention is drawn to conflicting effects of compositional variations on the property requirements which must be specified for sheet material and to the need for compromise in order to obtain a satisfactory combination of properties.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):23-27. doi:10.1115/1.3616602.

Materials for the turbine and combustor sections of gas turbine engines were evaluated for their resistance to sulfidation corrosion. The basic evaluation was conducted in a test facility by exposing the materials to a combustion gas atmosphere which simulates conditions of gas composition, corrosive combustion residue, gas velocity, and temperature that are encountered while operating a gas turbine engine in a marine environment. The influence of alloy composition, protective coatings, salt ingestion rates, and fuel sulfur content is discussed in relation to the degree of sulfidation corrosion. The mechanism of sulfidation corrosion attack, as determined by electron microprobe analyses and X-ray diffraction studies of corroded materials, is also discussed.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):29-38. doi:10.1115/1.3616604.

The single-blow, transient testing technique for determining the heat transfer characteristics of heat exchanger surfaces, with a summary of the underlying theory, a description of an experimental facility, and comments on the applicability of the technique, are presented. Heat transfer and flow friction data are presented for plate-fin type surfaces fabricated of perforated nickel plate. The data indicate that perforations increase heat transfer performance without a large frictional power penalty.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):41-46. doi:10.1115/1.3616611.

Design considerations required for base load long-life service at turbine inlet temperature above 1600 F are discussed. These include control of combustion profile, air cooling of the first-stage nozzle, long-shank turbine buckets, accurate air and fuel distribution, and accurate temperature control.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):49-59. doi:10.1115/1.3616616.

The performance of the vehicular split compressor differential gas turbine (SCDGT) engine is compared to that of the variable geometry free power turbine (FPT) engine. Fuel consumption, engine braking, acceleration, and starting are considered, and it is concluded that the SCDGT has several important advantages. The SCDGT engine needs no speed-changing gearbox for forward drive, its part-load fuel consumption is at least as good as that of the FPT engine, and its acceleration and ease of starting are better.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):61-66. doi:10.1115/1.3616619.

The combined effect of cold work and precipitation hardening treatments on the room-temperature hardness and tensile properties of A-286, Waspaloy, and Unitemp® 212 has been investigated. Significant increases in these properties were found for all alloys. A brief study of the effect of the stress rupture properties of cold-worked and aged A-286 indicated no detrimental effects for the temperature and stress levels investigated.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):67-73. doi:10.1115/1.3616623.

Vacuum arc remelting of electrodes prepared by the vacuum induction melting process is currently being used to provide high integrity forging billet stock of complex nickel-base superalloys. The purpose of this investigation was to study the effect of vacuum arc remelting of airmelt electrodes on the structure and properties of a popular nickel-base gas turbine superalloy—M-252. A secondary purpose was to study the effect of solution temperature on carbide banding, grain size, and properties of the resulting material. The results indicate that the use of airmelt electrodes is feasible for this particular alloy and probably for other gas turbine superalloys of a similar chemistry. The effects of forging temperature on carbide solution and grain growth are similar to those previously noted in vacuum induction melted product. A differential grain size effect, apparently related to the straightening operation used to produce the bar stock, was found to have a significant effect on the rupture and elevated temperature tensile properties.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):75-81. doi:10.1115/1.3616628.
Abstract
Topics: Thrust
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):83-85. doi:10.1115/1.3616630.

The possibility of the advantageous use of adjustable guidevanes in the compressor inlet for the control of single-shaft gas turbines is discussed. Considering certain design specifications that are impossible to be met by a fixed-geometry, single-shaft machine, it is pointed out how the design specifications can be met utilizing an inlet guidevane system. This is merely used as an example to point out the possible merits of such a system and that it may allow the designer to meet some extraordinary design requirements.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):86-93. doi:10.1115/1.3616631.

Two gas turbine-powered frigates for the Royal Danish Navy will go on sea trials during 1966. The CODAG propulsion units have good fuel consumption characteristics and light weight. Freewheeling clutches on each prime mover and a controllable pitch propeller have simplified the gear arrangement and the maneuvering procedure. The jet engine-powered gas turbines and the gears are described in some detail in the paper, which ends with a summary of the results from shop tests with the complete propulsion units.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):95-118. doi:10.1115/1.3616635.
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):125-143. doi:10.1115/1.3616564.

The development, progress, and sea experience of marine gas turbines in the U. S. Navy are reviewed. Practical problems encountered with engine components, installation arrangements, forward area support, and the marine environment are outlined. Development programs in progress with simple and regenerative open-cycle engines are presented. Development efforts of the future are postulated. Shipbuilding programs involving gas turbines are described. Gas turbines are now being considered for naval service over a wide range of power (40–25,000 hp per engine); the gas turbine should be further developed to meet projected needs; it, like any other prime mover, is to be treated as a component of an overall ship system and judged on the basis of lifetime cost, system reliability, maintainability, operability, performance, and personnel requirements. The authors suggest that specific weight and fuel rate, although significant features of any power source, have been overemphasized in the transfer of gas-turbine technology from aircraft to general marine use.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):150-164. doi:10.1115/1.3616575.
Abstract
Topics: Design , Gas turbines , Ships
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):165-170. doi:10.1115/1.3616576.

The potential advantages of an axial flow reversing marine gas turbine are presented in order to demonstrate the system’s aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility. From this analysis, it has been determined that such a system can be developed for operational use and will be competitive with other applicable thrust reversing mechanisms. The key to success of this system depends upon the establishment of a universally applicable calculation method for determining the rotation losses for backward-turning blades. A theory has been developed and utilized, with the predicted losses in good agreement with the limited test results that have been reported and are available. The aerodynamic and mechanical features developed for the reversing scheme are well within existing technology. Actual construction of a usable system depends primarily upon the increased demand for marine gas turbine propulsion equipment.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

DISCUSSIONS

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):82. doi:10.1115/1.3616629.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Thrust
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):118-119. doi:10.1115/1.3616554.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):119. doi:10.1115/1.3616555.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):119-120. doi:10.1115/1.3616557.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):120. doi:10.1115/1.3616558.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):120-121. doi:10.1115/1.3616559.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):121-122. doi:10.1115/1.3616560.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines , Navy
J. Eng. Power. 1967;89(1):123-124. doi:10.1115/1.3616562.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Gas turbines
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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