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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Measurements of the Rotordynamic Response of a Rotor Supported on Porous Type Gas Bearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Wanhui Liu

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
Changsha 410082, China
e-mail: liuwanhuihnu@gmail.com

Kai Feng

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and
Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
Changsha 410082, China
e-mail: jkai.feng@gmail.com

Yanwei Huo

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and
Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
Changsha 410082, China
e-mail: hnu_hyw@163.com

Zhiyang Guo

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and
Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
Changsha 410082, China
e-mail: guo_zy_123@hnu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received April 18, 2017; final manuscript received February 4, 2018; published online June 25, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Alexandrina Untaroiu.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 140(10), 102501 (Jun 25, 2018) (13 pages) Paper No: GTP-17-1146; doi: 10.1115/1.4039730 History: Received April 18, 2017; Revised February 04, 2018

A test rig is built in this study to measure the rotordynamic response of a rotor supported on porous-type gas bearings. A rotor with a double impulse turbine at one end is driven by compressed air and supported on two porous type journal gas bearings and a pair of bump-type thrust gas bearings. The rotor is accelerated to ∼25 krpm and coasted down in the test. The rotor dynamic response is measured for different bearing supply pressures (i.e., 0.40 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.50 MPa) and imbalance masses (i.e., 85 mg, 150 mg, and 215 mg). Synchronous and subsynchronous amplitudes are extracted from the rotor responses. The critical speed increases as the bearing supply pressure increases, but the damping ratio decreases. The onset speed of subsynchronous motion increases, and the subsynchronous amplitude decreases as the bearing supply pressure increases. The deceleration time is more than 5 min for a bearing supply pressure of 0.5 MPa, which reveals the very low drag friction of the porous gas bearings. The synchronous amplitude increases as the imbalance increases for all the tested bearing supply pressures. The critical speeds for different imbalances are almost the same, except for the out-of-phase imbalance condition under a bearing supply pressure of 0.50 MPa, in which the critical speed increases as the imbalance increases. The normalized synchronous amplitude shows the rotor-bearing system behaves almost in a linear fashion for all in-phase imbalance conditions. Nonlinear behavior is shown around the critical speed for the 215 mg out-of-phase imbalance condition under a bearing supply pressure of 0.50 MPa. The onset speed of the subsynchronous motion decreases as the imbalance increases under the in-phase imbalance condition. The predominant mode of vibration changes from cylindrical to conical and then back to cylindrical as the rotor speed decreases during the coast down test for the in-phase imbalance conditions. However, the rotor vibration mode is predominantly conical during the whole coast down test for the out-of-phase imbalance conditions.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Schematic and (b) picture of the test rig, sensor layout, and data acquisition system

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Fig. 2

(a) Schematic and photograph of the porous gas bearing. (b) Assembling of the porous gas bearing and test rig, and the epoxy resin adhesive injecting between O-rings after assembling.

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Fig. 3

Schematic of the air supply system

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Fig. 4

Rotor vertical synchronous responses at the disk end and turbine end for different supply pressures with baseline subtraction. (a) Amplitude and (b) phase angle at the disk end. (c) Amplitude and (d) phase angle at the turbine end.

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Fig. 5

Rotor vertical subsynchronous responses at the (a) disk end and (b) turbine end for different bearing supply pressures

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Fig. 6

Synchronous responses for horizontal and vertical displacements at the disk and turbine ends for the bearing supply pressure of 0.5 MPa with baseline subtraction

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Fig. 7

Coast down rotor speed versus deceleration time for different bearing supply pressures

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Fig. 8

Synchronous rotor responses in the vertical direction for test A ((a) disk end and (b) turbine end), test B ((c) disk end and (d) turbine end), and test C ((e) disk end and (f) turbine end) with baseline subtraction

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Fig. 9

Normalized synchronous amplitudes (vertical direction) for test A ((a) disk end and (b) turbine end), test B ((c) disk end and (d) turbine end), and test C ((e) disk end and (f) turbine end)

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Fig. 10

Subsynchronous responses in the vertical direction for test A (0.40 MPa supply pressure case, (a) disk end and (b) turbine end), and test B (0.45 MPa supply pressure case, (c) disk end and (d) turbine end)

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Fig. 11

Synchronous responses in the vertical direction for test D ((a) disk end and (b) turbine end), test E ((c) disk end and (d) turbine end), and test F ((e) disk end and (f) turbine end) with baseline subtraction

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Fig. 12

Normalized amplitudes (vertical direction) for test D ((a) disk end and (b) turbine end), test E ((c) disk end and (d) turbine end), and test F ((e) disk end and (f) turbine end) with baseline subtraction

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Fig. 13

(a) Rotordynamic model of the test rotor and (b) predicted undamped critical speed map

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Fig. 14

Amplitude ratio (disk end (DE)/turbine end (TE)) and phase difference (∠DE-∠TE) for different in-phase and out-of-phase imbalances. The bearing supply pressure is 0.40 MPa. (a) Amplitude ratio for the in-phase imbalances. (b) Amplitude ratio for the out-of-phase imbalances. (c) Phase difference for the in-phase imbalances. (d) Phase difference for the out-of-phase imbalances.

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Fig. 15

Amplitude ratio (DE/TE) and phase difference (∠DE-∠TE) for different in-phase and out-of-phase imbalances. The bearing supply pressure is 0.45 MPa. (a) Amplitude ratio for the in-phase imbalances. (b) Amplitude ratio for the out-of-phase imbalances. (c) Phase difference for the in-phase imbalances. (d) Phase difference for the out-of-phase imbalances.

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Fig. 16

Amplitude ratio (DE/TE) and phase difference (∠DE-∠TE) for different in-phase and out-of-phase imbalances. The bearing supply pressure is 0.50 MPa. (a) Amplitude ratio for the in-phase imbalances. (b) Amplitude ratio for the out-of-phase imbalances. (c) Phase difference for the in-phase imbalances. (d) Phase difference for the out-of-phase imbalances.

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