0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Attempts on the Reduction of Leakage Flow Through the Stator Well in an Axial Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaozhi Kong

School of Naval Architecture
and Ocean Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian, Liaoning 116026, China
e-mail: kongxiaozhi_lx@163.com

Yuxin Liu

School of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian, Liaoning 116026, China
e-mail: liuyuxin_lz@163.com

Gaowen Liu

School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
127 West Youyi Road,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: gwliu@nwpu.edu.cn

David M. Birch

Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey, UK
e-mail: d.birch@surrey.ac.uk

Longxi Zheng

School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
127 West Youyi Road,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: zhenglx@nwpu.edu.cn

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 27, 2018; final manuscript received January 25, 2019; published online February 11, 2019. Editor: Jerzy T. Sawicki.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 141(8), 082501 (Feb 11, 2019) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-18-1098; doi: 10.1115/1.4042651 History: Received February 27, 2018; Revised January 25, 2019

As performance improvements of compressors become more difficult to obtain, the optimization of stator well structure to control the reverse leakage flow is a more important research subject. Normally, the stator well can be considered as two rotor–stator cavities linked by the labyrinth seal. The flow with high tangential velocity and high total temperature exited from the stator well interacts with the main flow, which can affect the compressor aerodynamic performance. Based on the flow mechanisms in the basic stator well, four geometries were proposed and studied. For geometry a and geometry b, seal lips were attached to the rotor and stator inside downstream rim seal while impellers were positioned in the cavities for geometry c and geometry d. Leakage flow rates, tangential velocities, and pressure distributions in the cavities were analyzed using validated method of computational fluid dynamics. In the current study, where ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.05–1.30, the maximum reductions of leakage flow rate for geometry a and geometry b are 7.9% and 15.9%, respectively, compared to the baseline model. In addition, the rotating impellers in the downstream cavity for geometry c contribute to a more significant pressure gradient along radial direction, reducing the leakage flow as much as 46%. Although the stationary impellers in the upstream cavity for geometry d appear to have little effect upon the leakage, these impellers can be used to adjust the tangential velocity of ejected flow from the stator well to the mainstream.

Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Khaleghi, H. , Dehkordi, M. S. , and Tousi, A. M. , 2016, “ Role of Tip Injection in Desensitizing the Compressor to the Tip Clearance Size,” Aerosp. Sci. Technol., 52, pp. 10–17. [CrossRef]
Lewis, L. V. , 2002, “ In-Engine Measurements of Temperature Rises in Axial Compressor Shrouded Stator Cavities,” ASME Paper No. 2002-GT-30245.
Bayley, F. J. , and Childs, P. R. N. , 1994, “ Air Temperature Rises in Compressor and Turbine Stator Wells,” ASME Paper No. 94-GT-185.
Ozturk, H. K. , Childs, P. R. N. , Turner, A. B. , Hannis, J. M. , and Turner, J. R. , 1998, “ A Three Dimensional Computational Study of Windage Heating Within an Axial Compressor Stator Well,” ASME Paper No. 98-GT-119.
Scott, R. M. , Childs, P. R. N. , Hills, N. J. , and Millward, J. A. , 2000, “ Radial Inflow Into the Downstream Cavity of a Compressor Stator Well,” ASME Paper No. 2000-GT-0507.
Wellborn, S. R. , 2001, “ Details of Axial Compressor Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows,” ASME Paper No. 2001-GT-0495.
Wellborn, S. R. , Tolchinsky, I. , and Okiishi, T. H. , 2000, “ Modeling Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows in Axial-Flow Compressors,” ASME J. Turbomach., 122(1), pp. 55–61. [CrossRef]
Kong, X. , Liu, G. , Liu, Y. , and Zheng, L. , 2018, “ Performance Evaluation of the Inter-Stage Labyrinth Seal for Different Tooth Positions in an Axial Compressor,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., Part A, 232(6), pp. 579–592. [CrossRef]
Kong, X. , Liu, G. , Liu, Y. , and Zheng, L. , 2017, “ Experimental Testing for the Influences of Rotation and Tip Clearance on the Labyrinth Seal in a Compressor Stator Well,” Aerosp. Sci. Technol., 71, pp. 556–567. [CrossRef]
Öztürk, H. K. , Turner, A. B. , Childs, P. R. N. , and Bayley, F. J. , 2000, “ Stator Well Flows in Axial Compressors,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 21(6), pp. 710–716. [CrossRef]
Heidegger, N. J. , Hall, E. J. , and Delaney, R. A. , 1996, “ Parameterized Study of High Speed Compressor Seal Cavity,” AIAA Paper No. 96-2087.
Yoon, S. , Selmeier, R. , Cargill, P. , and Wood, P. , 2015, “ Effect of the Stator Hub Configuration and Stage Design Parameters on Aerodynamic Loss in Axial Compressors,” ASME J. Turbomach., 137(9), p. 091001. [CrossRef]
Kato, D. , Yamagami, M. , Tsuchiya, N. , and Kodama, H. , 2011, “ The Influence of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on the Aerodynamic Performance of a High-Speed Multistage Axial-Flow Compressor,” ASME Paper No. GT2011-46300.
Liu, G. , Kong, X. , Liu, Y. , and Feng, Q. , 2017, “ Effects of Rotational Speed on the Leakage Behavior, Temperature Increase, and Swirl Development of Labyrinth Seal in a Compressor Stator Well,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., Part G, 231(13), pp. 2362–2374. [CrossRef]
Kong, X. , Liu, G. , Lei, Z. , Chang, R. , and Liu, Y. , 2016, “ Experiment on Influence of Rotational Speeds on Labyrinth Seal in Compressor Stator Well,” J. Aerosp. Power, 31(7), pp. 1575–1582.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Typical compressor stator well

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The simplified baseline model (mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Labyrinth seal geometry

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Two-dimensional mesh generation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Test rig of compressor interstage seal

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The comparisons between computational results and test data (ω = 8000 rpm): (a) leakage flow rate and (b) tangential velocities in the downstream cavity (R/Rr = 0.956)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Four geometries: (a) geometry a, (b) geometry b, (c) geometry c, and (d) geometry d

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Streamlines for the axisymmetric stator well geometries: (a) geometry a and (b) geometry b

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

The comparisons of leakage flow rates for the cases of seal lips attached to the rotor and stator (ω = 8000 rpm)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Tangential velocities in the upstream and downstream stator wells for the cases of seal lips attached to the rotor and stator (ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.10): (a) downstream stator well (R/Rr = 0.946), (b) upstream stator well (R/Rr = 0.965)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Pressure distributions in downstream stator well for the cases of seal lips attached to the rotor and stator (R/Rr = 0.946, ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Cases of impellers added in the upstream and downstream cavities: (a) geometry c and (b) geometry d

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

The comparisons of leakage flow rates for the cases of impellers added in the upstream and downstream cavities (ω = 8000rpm, c =0.5 mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Tangential velocities and pressures in the downstream well for geometry c (ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.10): (a) tangential velocities and (b) pressures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

The comparison of windage heating between geometry c and baseline model (ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Tangential velocities and pressures in the upstream well for geometry d (ω = 8000 rpm, π = 1.10): (a) tangential velocities and (b) pressures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

The comparison of tangential velocities at upstream exit between geometry d and baseline model (ω = 8000rpm, π = 1.10)

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In